phalanstery


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Related to phalanstery: Fourierism

phal·an·ster·y

 (făl′ən-stĕr′ē)
n. pl. phal·an·ster·ies
1.
a. A self-sustaining cooperative community of the followers of Fourierism. Also called phalanx.
b. The buildings in such a community.
2. An association resembling a Fourierist phalanstery.

[French phalanstère : phalange, phalanx (from Latin phalanx, phalang-; see phalanx) + (mona)stère, monastery (from Late Latin monastērium; see monastery).]

phal′an·ste′ri·an (-stîr′ē-ən) adj. & n.
phal′an·ste′ri·an·ism n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

phalanstery

(ˈfælənstərɪ; -strɪ)
n, pl -steries
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in Fourierism)
a. buildings occupied by a phalanx
b. a community represented by a phalanx
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) any similar association or the buildings occupied by such an association
[C19: from French phalanstère, from phalange phalanx, on the model of monastère monastery]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

phal•an•ster•y

(ˈfæl ənˌstɛr i)

n., pl. -ster•ies.
1. (in Fourierism)
a. the buildings occupied by a phalanx.
b. the community itself.
2. any similar association, or the buildings they occupy.
[1840–50; < French phalanstère,b. phalange phalanx and monastère monastery]
phal`an•ster′i•an, adj., n.
phal`an•ster′i•an•ism, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Phalanstery

 a group or association of people or persons, especially those following the plan of Fourierism of socialist groups of 1800; people living together as one family.
Example: phalanstery of all the fiends, 1850.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
And it comes in the end to their reducing everything to the building of walls and the planning of rooms and passages in a phalanstery! The phalanstery is ready, indeed, but your human nature is not ready for the phalanstery--it wants life, it hasn't completed its vital process, it's too soon for the graveyard!
a real, great phalanstery, composed of brothers, almost all worthy of the name...
Fourier advocated organizing society around communal associations of producers, called "phalanges" or "phalanxes." The poem implies that Romney attempts to build such a community, "the famed phalanstery / At Leigh Hall," and we learn during one of Lord Howe's parties that Lady Waldemar is likely financing the project, which is patterned on "Fourier's own" (5.784-785).
The happiness of the phalanstery is a bonheur barbele.
Significantly, the breach between Coverdale and Hollingsworth occurs during a conversation about the future prospects of Blithedale, prompted by the residents' plan of erecting a communal architectural structure on the model of Fourier's phalanstery. Hollingsworth's dismissal of the plan comes as no surprise, since any consolidation or growth of the community would threaten the realization of his own project.
Brook Farm spent its entire store on building a "phalanstery," a Fourierist central hall, which fell victim to a fire.
The phalanstery would gather around 'fifteen hundred people of different fortunes, ages, characters, practical and theoretical knowledge, [...] and one would take care the greatest possible variety would exist, for the greater the variety the easiest it will be to harmonize them in little time' (31) Rossi in fact does not reach the point of stimulating competition between work groups, as Fourier does in the phalansterian model.
In the work of both Benjamin and Fuller, Fourier's appeal had to do with his rejection of isolated experiences generally; his utopian fantasy of universal harmony based itself on the premise that it took an entire phalanstery to liberate the vital passions of each individual.
He needs, on the contrary, to counter his feeling of incompleteness and insufficiency with a communal intimacy that "operate[s] the transfiguration of its dead into some substance or subject--be these homeland, native soil or blood, nation, a delivered or fulfilled humanity, absolute phalanstery, family, or mystical body" (Nancy Inoperative 15), the kind of communal consolation offered by patriotic acts.
Soon after another colonist group joined his, and the phalanstery "La Reunion" was founded in 1855 with 300 members.
The discussion focuses on two examples of practical utopianism in Fourier's phalanstery and Owenite settlements to suggest that "neither is revolutionary in the sense of supporting popular insurrection and both, in different ways, seek radical change by constitutional means" (51).
After necking his Diet Styx and smacking his aflame lips he staggers up and grabs the mike, condemns the whole phalanstery to his performance poetry, some kitsch Ovidian thing Raytheon and Erinys, bathotelescopic beyond belief, literally, then some thinky retro poetical work in progress full of you soften and you harden, all that fashionable legless jackbooting of the abstract second person, inevitable prosodic botox as points de capiton, * inevitable hackneyed sex negativity * inevitable recusant lyrical I * " muzakological Coucher du Roy klaxon solo * " UNHCR Damascus budget s etc, until finally this hot white Cheng-scenester But I live in imperative sympathy with you.