phalanx

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pha·lanx

 (fā′lăngks′, făl′ăngks′)
n. pl. pha·lanx·es or pha·lan·ges (fə-lăn′jēz, fā-)
1. A compact or close-knit body of people: "formed a solid phalanx in defense of the Constitution and Protestant religion" (G.M. Trevelyan).
2. A formation of infantry carrying overlapping shields and long spears, developed by Philip II of Macedon and used by Alexander the Great.
3. pl. phalanges Anatomy A bone of a finger or toe. Also called phalange.

[Latin phalanx, phalang-, from Greek.]

phalanx

(ˈfælæŋks)
n, pl phalanxes or phalanges (fæˈlændʒiːz)
1. (Military) an ancient Greek and Macedonian battle formation of hoplites presenting long spears from behind a wall of overlapping shields
2. any closely ranked unit or mass of people: the police formed a phalanx to protect the embassy.
3. a number of people united for a common purpose
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in Fourierism) a group of approximately 1800 persons forming a commune in which all property is collectively owned
5. (Anatomy) anatomy any of the bones of the fingers or toes.
6. (Botany) botany
a. a bundle of stamens, joined together by their stalks (filaments)
b. a form of vegetative spread in which the advance is on a broad front, as in the common reed. Compare guerrilla
[C16: via Latin from Greek: infantry formation in close ranks, bone of finger or toe]

pha•lanx

(ˈfeɪ læŋks, ˈfæl æŋks)

n., pl. pha•lanx•es for 1-6, pha•lan•ges (fəˈlæn dʒiz for 7.)
1. (in ancient Greece) a group of heavily armed infantry formed in ranks and files close and deep, with shields joined and long spears overlapping.
2. any body of troops in close array.
3. a number of persons united for a common purpose.
4. a compact or closely massed body of persons, animals, or things.
5. (in Fourierism) a group of about 1800 persons, living together and holding their property in common.
6. any of the bones of the fingers or toes.
[1545–55; < Latin < Greek phálanx military formation, bone of finger or toe, wooden roller]

phalanx

an ancient military formation of serried ranks surrounded by shields; hence, any crowded mass of people or group united for a common purpose.
See also: Crowds

Phalanx

 a line or array of battle; a compact group of people or animals prepared for attack or defence; a body of persons or things drawn up together in a common purpose.
Examples: phalanx of cavaliers and dames, 1837; of elms, 1891; of Greeks, 1983; of infantry; of lawyers, 1817; of sheep, 1785; of soldiers, 1553; of migrating storks, 1733.

phalanx

A Greek military formation of ranked armored hoplites.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phalanx - any of the bones of the fingers or toesphalanx - any of the bones of the fingers or toes
bone, os - rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
dactyl, digit - a finger or toe in human beings or corresponding body part in other vertebrates
2.phalanx - any closely ranked crowd of people
crowd - a large number of things or people considered together; "a crowd of insects assembled around the flowers"
3.phalanx - a body of troops in close array
military force, military group, military unit, force - a unit that is part of some military service; "he sent Caesar a force of six thousand men"
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"

phalanx

noun
Related words
adjective phalangeal
Translations
falangi
falanga

phalanx

[ˈfælæŋks] N (phalanges (pl)) [fæˈlændʒiːz]falange f

phalanx

n pl <-es or phalanges>
(Anat) → Finger-/Zehenglied nt, → Phalanx f (spec)
(= body of people, troops)Phalanx f

pha·lanx

n. falange, uno de los huesos largos de los dedos de los pies o las manos.
References in classic literature ?
"Oh, for a gatling!" groaned Good, as he contemplated the serried phalanxes beneath us.
As when some mighty wave that thunders on the beach when the west wind has lashed it into fury--it has reared its head afar and now comes crashing down on the shore; it bows its arching crest high over the jagged rocks and spews its salt foam in all directions--even so did the serried phalanxes of the Danaans march steadfastly to battle.
Northampton, which was much more industrially inclined than any of the Fourierist phalanxes, shared their difficulties with debt.
I declined, fearing phalanxes of litigious lawyers.
They just formed into better phalanxes and were able to defeat horse-drawn infantry.
In this film noir version of It's a Wonderful Life, Moore's working-class hometown has become George Bailey's Pottersville, a rustbelt graveyard where the rich are ensconced behind phalanxes of security guards and the children of factory workers are being tossed from their homes.
The systems will be delivered within two years and will bring the number of Phalanxes deployed on Greek naval vessels to 20.
We're now moving around phalanxes of moored ship ...
These are the events and their monuments which presently haunt (and taunt) Berliners, especially as phalanxes of cranes are unleashed to recreate a capital city.