phallocratic

phallocratic

(ˌfæləˈkrætɪk)
adj
(Sociology) sociol relating to a male, or the beliefs assumed by such, who assumes authority over females due to his maleness
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Anna's and Hamilton's internal feelings of gender inferiority and their embrace of masculinist practices, then, are results of a phallocratic, immoral economy.
The construction of women as social objects is a prevalent theme of women's literature that challenges the phallocratic grand narrative of Western history that limits the space of women in society.
Psychoanalysis is used not only to deepen a cinematographic analysis but to analyze a dominant phallocratic discourse based on a sexual difference that supports the truth of all science, the logic of the whole discourse.
At the other end of the spectrum, the xenophobic outbursts provoked by the reasonable accommodation debate were linked to a national narrative that used the pretense of defending women's rights to advance a white and phallocratic nationalist agenda.
"That's the on[ly] hole in town it hasn't been in." How refreshing to find Bernstein, now in her seventies, undaunted by art-world vagaries, holding strong to her ever-apropos critique of phallocratic madness.
Through Willis, Khiari said she combats phallocratic doctrines and religious conservatism that threaten today's Tunisian society (Meddeb, 2013).
Unregulated by orgasmic impetus or teleology, the vulva can play anatomical host to the clitoris and reconfigure its relationship to a phallocratic understanding of genital difference.
(28) Elise Mballa Meka's insightful novel Une Nuit dans le Sissongo (2009) sheds light on the popular imagination of the pervasive phallocratic power in contemporary Cameroon.
West's text is written in the metropole and makes it its diegetic space, but in its portrayal of witnessing it deploys a temporality and spatiality discontinuous with diegetic time and with the space of the nation-state, coordinates that exceed the limits of metropolitan and phallocratic visions.
The narcissistic woman may be arming herself with the attributes of the very phallocratic order that imprisons her within its gender hierarchies, but she nevertheless fights toward something like a personal, self-determined version of gendered subjectivity in her narcissistic project.