phasedown

phase·down

 (fāz′doun′)
n.
A gradual reduction.

phasedown

(ˈfeɪzˌdaʊn)
n
a steady and progressive diminution
References in periodicals archive ?
(159) If EPA were to revisit that decision, a modern CBA would likely have justified an even faster phasedown; more recent studies suggest that the benefits of phasing out lead in gasoline were substantially higher than initially estimated.
A combined strategy to phasedown HFCs along with improvements in energy efficiency can potentially double the climate benefits - while saving up to USD 2.9 trillion globally through 2050 by using less electricity, according to figures from the International Energy Agency.
A franchise tax phasedown continued with a rate reduction from 2.5 to 2.25 mills.
These include India's decision to phase out single-use plastics, signing of an agreement by 12 countries guaranteeing environmental rights in Latin America and the Caribbean and the ratification of the Kigali Amendment by several countries to bring about a global phasedown of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs).
As a result, customers have been forced into adopting commercial, line-assembled CO2 packs, geared towards non industrial applications or HFCs which are subject to phasedown.
Daikin believes that the transition to R32 will help to meet both the HFC phasedown schedule and the HCFC phaseout schedule of the Montreal Protocol.
The major highlights of the Minamata Convention include a ban on new mercury mines, the phaseout of existing ones, the phaseout and phasedown of mercury use in a number of products and processes, control measures on emissions to air, land and water, and the regulation of the informal sector engaged in artisanal and small-scale gold mining.
The company, however, pointed out that HFCs tend to have a high global warming potential (GWP), and have also become subject to phasedown regulations.
16, 2016, the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol was passed, paving the way for the global phasedown of HFCs.
The phasedown in tax liability might serve as a (somewhat arbitrary) proxy for that diminishing connection, consistent with Dan Shaviro's observation that "we are inclined to care somewhat less about our own people when they are abroad for extended periods..." (217) To the extent it reduces an individual's tax liability, this proposal might also be supported by citizenship neutrality concerns because it decreases the tax cost of retaining citizenship (although, as discussed above, the number of tax-induced citizenship losses is already relatively limited, so the number of individuals whose decision ultimately would have turned on the marginal difference between full taxation and 50%- or 25%-of-normal taxation may be extremely limited).