pheasant

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pheas·ant

 (fĕz′ənt)
n. pl. pheas·ants or pheasant
1. Any of various game birds of the family Phasianidae, characteristically having a long tail, especially the ring-necked pheasant. The males of many species have brilliantly colored plumage.
2. Any of several other birds that resemble a pheasant, such as a partridge.

[Middle English fesaunt, from Old French fesan, from Latin phāsiānus, from Greek phāsiānos (ornīs), (bird) of the Phasis River, pheasant, from Phāsis, the ancient name for the Rioni River in the Republic of Georgia.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pheasant

(ˈfɛzənt)
n
1. (Animals) any of various long-tailed gallinaceous birds of the family Phasianidae, esp Phasianus colchicus (ring-necked pheasant), having a brightly-coloured plumage in the male: native to Asia but introduced elsewhere
2. (Animals) any of various other gallinaceous birds of the family Phasianidae, including the quails and partridges
3. (Animals) US and Canadian any of several other gallinaceous birds, esp the ruffed grouse
[C13: from Old French fesan, from Latin phāsiānus, from Greek phasianos ornis Phasian bird, named after the River Phasis, in Colchis]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pheas•ant

(ˈfɛz ənt)

n.
1. any of numerous large, typically long-tailed gallinaceous birds of the family Phasianidae, principally of Asia, though introduced in other parts of the world.
2. Southern U.S. the ruffed grouse.
[1250–1300; Middle English fesaunt < Anglo-French; Old French fesan < Latin phāsiānus < Greek phāsiānós (órnis) (bird) of the Phasis, river in Colchis]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pheasant - large long-tailed gallinaceous bird native to the Old World but introduced elsewherepheasant - large long-tailed gallinaceous bird native to the Old World but introduced elsewhere
phasianid - a kind of game bird in the family Phasianidae
genus Phasianus, Phasianus - type genus of the Phasianidae: the typical pheasants
Phasianus colchicus, ring-necked pheasant - common pheasant having bright plumage and a white neck ring
afropavo, Afropavo congensis, Congo peafowl - both sexes are brightly colored
argus pheasant, argus - large brilliantly patterned East Indian pheasant
Chrysolophus pictus, golden pheasant - brightly colored crested pheasant of mountains of western and central Asia
monal, monaul - brilliantly colored pheasant of southern Asia
bird of Juno, peafowl - very large terrestrial southeast Asian pheasant often raised as an ornamental bird
tragopan - brilliantly colored Asian pheasant having wattles and two fleshy processes on the head
2.pheasant - flesh of a pheasant; usually braised
Phasianus colchicus, ring-necked pheasant - common pheasant having bright plumage and a white neck ring
game bird - any bird (as grouse or pheasant) that is hunted for sport
wildfowl - flesh of any of a number of wild game birds suitable for food
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

pheasant

noun
Related words
collective nouns nye, nide
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
تَدَرُجٌثُدْرُج: ديك بَرّيوَجْبَة ثُدْرُج
bažant
fasan
fasaani
fazan
fácán
fashani
キジ
phasianus
fazanas
fazāna gaļafazāns
fazan
bažant
fasan
ไก่ฟ้า
sülünsülün eti
фазан
chim trĩ

pheasant

[ˈfeznt] Nfaisán m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

pheasant

[ˈfɛzənt] nfaisan m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

pheasant

nFasan m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

pheasant

[ˈfɛznt] nfagiano
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

pheasant

(ˈfeznt) plurals ˈpheasants ~ˈpheasant noun
1. a type of long-tailed bird, the male of which has brightly-coloured feathers and certain types of which are often shot for sport. a brace of pheasant(s); two pheasants.
2. (the flesh of) the bird as food. We had roast pheasant for dinner.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

pheasant

تَدَرُجٌ bažant fasan Fasan φασιανός faisán fasaani faisan fazan fagiano キジ fazant fasan bażant faisão фазан fasan ไก่ฟ้า sülün chim trĩ 野鸡
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
Taking seats in a carriage drawn by long-tailed horses with pheasants' feathers erect between their ears, the Ambroses, Mr.
In England he had galloped in a red coat over hedges and killed two hundred pheasants for a bet.
Who else could have been charming rabbits and pheasants as the natives charm snakes in India?
"Here are the greatest number of our plants, and here are the curious pheasants."
After the hare, he ordered some partridges, a few pheasants, a couple of rabbits, and a dozen frogs and lizards.
The eggs of pullets, partridges, pheasants, &c., were, as George well knew, the most favourite dainties of Sophia.
The country abounded with aquatic and land birds, such as swans, wild geese, brant, ducks of almost every description, pelicans, herons, gulls, snipes, curlews, eagles, vultures, crows, ravens, magpies, woodpeckers, pigeons, partridges, pheasants, grouse, and a great variety of singing birds.
'Are you too busy making love to my niece to make war with the pheasants? - First of October, remember!
There’s plenty of pheasants among the swamps; and the snow-birds are flying round your own door, where you may feed them with crumbs, and shoot them at pleasure, any day; but if you’re for a buck, or a little bear's meat, Judge, you’ll have to take the long rifle, with a greased wadding, or you’ll waste more powder than you’ll fill stomachs, I’m thinking.”
You who love sporting, and who, whether you admit it or not, are a poet, my dear friend, you will find pheasants, rail and teal, without counting sunsets and excursions on the water, to make you fancy yourself Nimrod and Apollo themselves.
Therefore my Lady Dedlock has come away from the place in Lincolnshire and has left it to the rain, and the crows, and the rabbits, and the deer, and the partridges and pheasants. The pictures of the Dedlocks past and gone have seemed to vanish into the damp walls in mere lowness of spirits, as the housekeeper has passed along the old rooms shutting up the shutters.
He came to know the ground-nesting birds and the difference between the customs of the valley quail, the mountain quail, and the pheasants. The traits and lairs of the domestic cats gone wild he also learned, as did he learn the wild loves of mountain farm-dogs with the free-roving coyotes.