phenakistoscope


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phenakistoscope

(ˌfɛnəˈkɪstəˌskəʊp)
n
an early form of a zoetrope in which figures are depicted in different poses around the edge of a disc. When the disc is spun, and the figures observed through the apertures around the edge of the disc, they appear to be moving
References in periodicals archive ?
It had an advantage over the phenakistoscope in that several people could watch it simultaneously.
Whether hailed or cursed, the most outstanding even disturbing novelty of film is without doubt to capture and reproduce movement, even if inventions like the phenakistoscope or the zoetrope that produced the illusion of moving images preceded the invention of the film camera and projector.
Another insight related to Kentridge's "stalking the drawing" in the studio brought him to a discussion of the primitive instruments of cinema, with the whirl of their little windows opening onto the image to blur it into movement: the phenakistoscope, the zoetrope.
A distinctive element of Flatpack is the visual identity created for the festival by designer Dave Gaskarth whose unique stamp is visible over all the festival literature.; The pedal-powered phenakistoscope will be on show at Floodgate Kino at this year's Flatpack
Additionally, Jacques Daguerre invents the diorama (1822) and the daguerreotype (1839), and the public of the 1830s enjoys a succession of increasingly vivid optical toys, including the phenakistoscope (1832) (described in Baudelaire's 1853 essay "La Morale du joujou"), the zoetrope (1834), and later the praxinoscope (1877).
His preoccupation with early cinema and the various visual apparatuses prefiguring it, has dictated the direction of his more recent works, for example Phenakistoscope (2000) and 7 Fragments for Georges Melies (2003).
Those are the more familiar -- Sterling also mentions the phenakistoscope, the teleharmonium and something called Telefon Hirmondo.
Hinton performs a rich historical reading by showing that Flaubert's ostensibly objective narrative gaze--which represents the apogee of fictional realism--in this and other novels parallels the technologies of vision that became increasingly available in nineteenth-century France, including the daguerrotype camera, the Phenakistoscope, the Zoetrope, the Praxinoscope, and the stereoscope, among others.
In 1995, the science-fiction writer Bruce Sterling, whose body resides most of the time in Austin, Texas, posted a message on the Web inviting people to write what he called "The Handbook of Dead Media," an exercise in "media forensics" or (varying the metaphor) "a naturalist's field guide for the communications paleontologist." The idea was to track the history of the once-vibrant but now forgotten, the junk store of silenced communications along the road of obsolescence: the phenakistoscope, the teleharmonium, the stereopticon, the Telefon Hirmondo, the Antikythera Device, and a thousand more gadgets and extensions of human experience that once lived and do so no more.
"Motion toys," with such exotic names as the Phenakistoscope, the Traumatrope, and the Zoetrope (literally, wheel of life), became increasingly popular in the nineteenth century.
But in the interim, the lantern's technology combined with Roget's theory gave rise to the possibility of the kinetic toys and so there was the thaumascope, and the phenakistoscope, and tops and whizzigigs.