phenocopy


Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to phenocopy: genocopy, Genetic heterogeneity

phe·no·cop·y

 (fē′nə-kŏp′ē)
n. pl. phe·no·cop·ies
1. An environmentally induced, nonhereditary trait in an organism that closely resembles a genetically determined trait, especially a mutation.
2. An individual exhibiting such a trait.

phenocopy

(ˈfiːnəʊˌkɒpɪ)
n, pl -copies
(Genetics) a noninheritable change in an organism that is caused by environmental influence during development but resembles the effects of a genetic mutation

phe•no•cop•y

(ˈfi nəˌkɒp i)

n., pl. -cop•ies.
a trait or condition that resembles a known genetic defect but is externally caused and not inheritable.
[< German Phänokopie (1935); see phenotype, copy]
References in periodicals archive ?
We confirmed that the double mutant devoid of these two peptide genes was a phenocopy of the receptor mutant, and external application of the synthetic peptides restored contiguous Casparian strip formation in the mutant roots.
Rhabdomyoma of the interventricular septum presenting as a Brugada phenocopy.
Inhibition of Jagged-mediated Notch signaling disrupts zebrafish biliary development and generates multi-organ defects compatible with an Alagille syndrome phenocopy.
ZnT3 knockout mice, who have synaptic zinc deficiency, seem to be "a phenocopy for the synaptic and memory deficits of AD.
That similarity - technically called a phenocopy - clearly shows that Lys05 works by interfering with the recycling system in cells.
That similarity -- technically called a phenocopy -- clearly shows that Lys05 works by interfering with the recycling system in cells.
Adaptation and intelligence: Organic selection and phenocopy.
The two studies' methodological differences notwithstanding, we believe an apt framework for explaining this lies in the hypotheses of Tannock and Brown (2000): (a) the phenocopy hypothesis, which posits that ADHD as a disorder is secondary to reading disability or another primary disorder, and that only secondary symptoms are present, none with profound characteristics such as, for example, cognitive or cerebral deficit and (b) the etiologic hypothesis, according to which the comorbid subgroup of ADHD + RD has a different etiology than the disorders as they occur independently of one another.