phenomenology


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

phe·nom·e·nol·o·gy

 (fĭ-nŏm′ə-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. A philosophy or method of inquiry based on the premise that reality consists of objects and events as they are perceived or understood in human consciousness and not of anything independent of human consciousness.
2. A movement based on this, originated about 1905 by Edmund Husserl.

phe·nom′e·no·log′i·cal (-nə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
phe·nom′e·no·log′i·cal·ly adv.
phe·nom′e·nol′o·gist n.

phenomenology

(fɪˌnɒmɪˈnɒlədʒɪ)
n
1. (Philosophy) the movement founded by Husserl that concentrates on the detailed description of conscious experience, without recourse to explanation, metaphysical assumptions, and traditional philosophical questions
2. (Philosophy) the science of phenomena as opposed to the science of being
phenomenological adj
pheˌnomenoˈlogically adv
pheˌnomeˈnologist n

phe•nom•e•nol•o•gy

(fɪˌnɒm əˈnɒl ə dʒi)

n.
1. the study of phenomena as distinct from ontology.
2. the branch of a field of study that classifies phenomena relevant to itself.
3. the system of Husserl and his followers stressing the description of phenomena.
[1790–1800]
phe•nom`e•no•log′i•cal (-nlˈɒdʒ ɪ kəl) adj.
phe•nom`e•no•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
phe•nom`e•nol′o•gist, n.
ontology, phenomenology - Ontology is the branch of metaphysics concerned with the nature or essence of being or existence, the opposite of phenomenology, the science of phenomena.
See also related terms for phenomena.

phenomenology

1. the study of phenomena.
2. the philosophical system of Edmund Husserl and his followers, especially the careful description of phenomena in all areas of experience. — phenomenologist, n.phenomenologic, phenomenological, adj.
See also: Philosophy

phenomenology

A philosophical doctrine established by Husserl; the science of appearances.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phenomenology - a philosophical doctrine proposed by Edmund Husserl based on the study of human experience in which considerations of objective reality are not taken into account
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
Translations

phenomenology

[fɪˈnɒmɪˈnɒlədʒɪ] Nfenomenología f

phenomenology

References in periodicals archive ?
Professor Gubser opens his narrative with the statement: "The history of phenomenology is partly the history of friendships among the early disciples of Husserl in Munich and Gottingen, among East European dissidents who joined together against their regimes, and among scholars who study philosophy today.
Critique; An erudite and impressive work of seminal scholarship, "The Good of Recognition: Phenomenology, Ethics, and Religion in the Thought of Levinas and Ricoeur" will prove to be an enduringly valued addition to academic library Philosophy Studies collections in general, and a critically important addition to the supplemental studies reading lists for students of the lives and works of Emmanuel Levinas and Paul Ricoeur in particular.
As such, it might be maintained that this Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Phenomenology performatively shows that it is not phenomenology but the distinction between analytic and continental that is a quaint historical curiosity, and indeed one that that we should all be happy has passed into history.
examines the mess that the Nazis created, including Heidegger on humanism, Junger on war for the sake of war, Lowith on having a sense of humor and a sense of departure from the German masters, Arendt on banality, Gadamer on phenomenology and the disinfection of language, Amery on phenomenology in the death camps, and Assmann on violence.
Instead, Cinematic Emotions reads like a defense of film and phenomenology that happens to mention film genre, a problem that can be more precisely linked to Hanich's reluctance to acknowledge the importance of psychoanalysis and feminist theory and criticism for theoretical interpretations of the horror film.
This has been a long awaited publication, providing a wonderful, erudite expose of what phenomenology is, and how to do it.
From the first formulation of the reformative program of philosophy in the Logical Investigations, phenomenology claimed to be science.
Words of Life: New Theological Turns in French Phenomenology" discusses the evolution of modern French philosophy, or its current form, phenomenology.
Originally published in 1990, Phenomenologie materielle was Henry's response to critiques of his earlier magnum opus, L'essence de la manifestation (1963); as such, it expands and develops many of the central themes of Henry's philosophy regarding Husserlian phenomenology and the radicalization of a "material phenomenology" devoted to "the discovery of the reign of a phenomenality that is constructed in such a surprising way that the thought that always thinks about the world never thinks about it" (2).
com/), "defines the work as phenomenological and that which would help define phenomenology to be the science of the new millennia," she writes.
Topics include extra dimensions; The International Linear Collider; astrophysical aspects of neutrinos; leptogenesis; neutrino experiments; string theory, string model-building, and string phenomenology--a practical introduction; theoretical aspects of neutrino masses and mixings; searching for the Higgs boson; Z phenomenology and the LHC; neutrinoless double beta decay; and supersymmetry in elementary particle physics.
Though certainly not an easy read--Ahmed draws on Marxist theory, interpellation, and performativity among others in her integration of phenomenology and queer theory--this book is nevertheless inspiring, stimulating, and a pleasure to read.