philology


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phi·lol·o·gy

 (fĭ-lŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. Literary study or classical scholarship.

[Middle English philologie, from Latin philologia, love of learning, from Greek philologiā, from philologos, fond of learning or of words : philo-, philo- + logos, reason, speech; see -logy.]

phi·lol′o·ger, phi·lol′o·gist n.
phil′o·log′ic (fĭl′ə-lŏj′ĭk), phil′o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
phil′o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

philology

(fɪˈlɒlədʒɪ)
n
1. (Linguistics) comparative and historical linguistics
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the scientific analysis of written records and literary texts
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (no longer in scholarly use) the study of literature in general
[C17: from Latin philologia, from Greek: love of language]
philological adj
ˌphiloˈlogically, ˌphiloˈlogic adv
phiˈlologist, philologian, phiˈlologer n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

phi•lol•o•gy

(fɪˈlɒl ə dʒi)

n.
1. the study of literary texts and of written records, the establishment of their authenticity and their original form, and the determination of their meaning.
2. (esp. in older use) linguistics, esp. historical and comparative linguistics.
[1350–1400; < Latin philologia < Greek philología love of learning and literature =philólog(os) literary]
phil•o•log•i•cal (ˌfɪl əˈlɒdʒ ɪ kəl) phil`o•log′ic, adj.
phil`o•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
phi•lol′o•gist, phi•lol′o•ger, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

philology

1. the study of written records to determine their authenticity, original form, and meaning.
2. linguistics, especially historical linguistics. — philologist, philologer, n. — philologic, philological, adj.
See also: Linguistics
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

philology

The study of language.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.philology - the humanistic study of language and literature
arts, humanistic discipline, humanities, liberal arts - studies intended to provide general knowledge and intellectual skills (rather than occupational or professional skills); "the college of arts and sciences"
dialectology - the branch of philology that is devoted to the study of dialects
lexicology - the branch of linguistics that studies the lexical component of language
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
filologie
filologijajezikoznanstvo
filologija

philology

[fɪˈlɒlədʒɪ] Nfilología f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

philology

[fɪˈlɒlədʒi] nphilologie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

philology

nPhilologie f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

philology

[fɪˈlɒlədʒɪ] nfilologia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
And yet the former history continues to be studied side by side with the laws of statistics, geography, political economy, comparative philology, and geology, which directly contradict its assumptions.
As for the philology of them, that is but a circle of tales, and therefore not fit for this writing.
Though the form-masters still taught French to the lower school, another master had come, with a degree of doctor of philology from the University of Heidelberg and a record of three years spent in a French lycee, to teach French to the upper forms and German to anyone who cared to take it up instead of Greek.
But suppose one pass, as is permissible in philology, from the word itself to its softened synonym, then, instead of committing an ignoble assassination you make an `elimination;' you merely and simply remove from your path the individual who is in your way, and that without shock or violence, without the display of the sufferings which, in the case of becoming a punishment, make a martyr of the victim, and a butcher, in every sense of the word, of him who inflicts them.
Foot Couplets I do not make any apology For this study in philology It's for your own inspection Or to alter the inflection These are the plain facts Phraseology but no syntax I never meddle round the rim Or edge borders of synonym A palindrome there and back To level out all the slack A diversion not a detour A remedy but not a cure The verb to cure is preserved And quite simply not inferred If there's any irony inside There's no recourse to deride This will never satiate a greed But may well amuse to read.
This year's volume of studies in classical philology contains 20 essays.
The lowest success rate was in the Greek philology exams, where only 6.8 per cent of the 799 people who took the exam got an overall pass grade.They were tested on Greek language, linguistics, literature, Latin, ancient Greek, history, and also took a skills test.
At the second and third place are the courses"Public Administration" and "Sociology", followed by "English Philology", "Computer Science", "Software Engineering", "Bulgarian Philology", "Informatics", "Information Systems" .
This leads Masten to propose a "queer philology," which proceeds from two main methodological maxims: "Comprehension of sex will require philology," and "There is rarely philology without sex" (15, 20).
Anom Soeroto: A study in performance philology. Singapore: NUS Press, 2016, 648 pp.
This statement seems to betray what Erich Auerbach believed when he attempted to define Weltliteratur and the role of philology: "a good point of departure must be exact and objective" ("Philology" 15).