phish


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phish

 (fĭsh)
intr.v. phished, phish·ing, phish·es
To request confidential information over the internet or by telephone under false pretenses in order to fraudulently obtain credit card numbers, passwords, or other personal data.

[Alteration (influenced by phreak) of fish.]
Translations
hyökkäysphishing
hameçonner
References in periodicals archive ?
"What band is this?" a much younger man in a baseball cap asked me on the Friday night of this year's Bonnaroo in mid-June, at a point when it shouldn't have been more obvious that the answer to this question was Phish. Roughly 24 hours later, I explained to a trio of 19-year-old Kentuckians that I wasn't saying that I was a fish, but that Phish was in fact a multi-night headlining act at the very festival they had paid hundreds of dollars to attend.
Jam band Phish will play three consecutive nights at the Allstate Arena in Rosemont this October as part of a 14-date fall tour announced Tuesday.
With enhanced dashboards and new analytics to track organizational risk and employee performance, Phish Threat simplifies a key part of an organizations security strategy--employee awareness and training.
According to Wombat Security's annual State of the Phish report, 76% of organizations experienced a phishing attack in 2017.
Pittsburgh-based Wombat Security Technologies released its annual "State of the Phish" research report.
This involves using special symbols in the URL of a website and can be used to redirect to a phish website.
Instead of waiting for one to hit, they preemptively phish their workforce to see how people respond.
Salvador managed to phish information by sending emails to customers of the bank, informing the clients that due to security reasons, the bank was performing an update of its online banking database and the customers need to update their bank information by clicking on a link.
Sophos has introduced its Sophos Phish Threat, an advanced security testing and training platform designed to reduce risk from IT's attack surface, the end-user.
Kumaraguru et al., "Anti-Phishing Phil: the design and evaluation of a game that teaches people not to fall for phish," in Proceedings of the 3rd Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security (SOUPS '07), Pittsburgh, Pa, USA, July 2007
Existing anti-phishing education can be classified as (1) contextual training, such as Microsoft's phishing education page (Microsoft, 2013); (2) game-based training, such as Carnegie Mellon's Phish Guru (Kumaraguru et al., 2009; Kumaraguru et al., 2007a) or the Anti-Phishing Education Game, where a soldier has to avoid phishing attacks by means of identifying whether the hyperlink is a phishing URL or not (Yang et al., 2012); or (3) embedded training (Kumaraguru et al., 2007b).
Email-based approaches utilize characteristics and features about phishing emails to determine patterns across emails used to phish victims.