phloem


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phlo·em

 (flō′ĕm′)
n.
The tissue of vascular plants that conducts food produced by photosynthesis to all parts of the plant and consists of sieve elements, fibers, and parenchyma.

[German, from Greek phloios, bark; see bhleu- in Indo-European roots.]

phloem

(ˈfləʊɛm)
n
(Botany) tissue in higher plants that conducts synthesized food substances to all parts of the plant
[C19: via German from Greek phloos bark]

phlo•em

(ˈfloʊ ɛm)

n.
the part of a vascular bundle consisting of sieve tubes, companion cells, parenchyma, and fibers and forming the food-conducting tissue of a plant.
[< German (1858), irreg. < Greek phló(os) bark (variant of phloiós) + -ēma deverbal n. ending]

phlo·em

(flō′ĕm′)
A tissue in vascular plants that conducts food from the leaves to the other plant parts. Phloem consists primarily of tube-like cells that have porous openings. In mature woody plants it forms a sheath-like layer of tissue in the stem, just inside the bark. See more at cambium, photosynthesis. Compare xylem.

phloem

Tissue that carries food in plants.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phloem - (botany) tissue that conducts synthesized food substances (e.g., from leaves) to parts where neededphloem - (botany) tissue that conducts synthesized food substances (e.g., from leaves) to parts where needed; consists primarily of sieve tubes
phytology, botany - the branch of biology that studies plants
vascular tissue - tissue that conducts water and nutrients through the plant body in higher plants
sieve tube - tube formed by cells joined end-to-end through which nutrients flow in flowering plants and brown algae
Translations
lýko
nila
háncsrész
floëem
References in periodicals archive ?
CLRDV is a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus that affects the phloem cells of the plants and is transmitted by cotton aphids.
The leaves of these cultivars showed high amounts of parenchyma and phloem, which are the main tissues in the diet of cattle because of their primary structure and thin cell walls; thus, the leaf anatomy can be a useful tool to assess the digestibility potential of a given forage (PACIULLO, 2002).
Mg is an essential element for the plant development, which is required in several metabolic processes and reactions, such as photophosphorylation, carbon dioxide fixation in photosynthesis, protein and chlorophyll synthesis, phloem loading, assimilate partitioning, reactive oxygen species formation and photo-oxidation in leaf tissues (CAKMAK; YAZICI, 2010).
In Coccoidea (Hemiptera), the first nymphs (crawlers) were known to induce solitary galls by sucking on phloem or on parenchymatic tissues (Meyer, 1987).
Branch girdling stops phloem flow, which is retained around the larvae, making the wood more nutritious (Forcella 1982).
In wheat, free amino acids are major components of both phloem and xylem sap.
Without xylem and phloem and with paper-thin leaves, mosses rely on direct contact with water to stay hydrated and nourished and to reproduce; male and female parts are separate, and the sperm -- not pollen -- needs water to swim to its target.
It also means that botany textbooks around the world will need to update their descriptions of how the two types of vascular tissues in plants -- xylem (better known as wood) that transports water and phloem that transports nutrients -- form, differentiate and grow.
Secondary phloem formed of elliptical-shapeless, round-shaped, irregular-arranged and 4-6 row cells under the periderm is taken part.
In the four varieties, syncytia developed within the vascular tissues; specifically, they occupied part of the xylem and displaced the phloem to the periphery (Figures 2E, F); they produced reduction, rupture and fragmentation of those tissues.
Herbivores of a phloem feeding guild are likely lo evade plant defenses, while chewers may be more vulnerable toward plant immune responses (Ali and Agrawal, 2012).
Two strands of phloem occurred in vascular bundles (Figs 2 and 3).