phonematic


Also found in: Medical.

pho·ne·mat·ic

 (fō′nĭ-măt′ĭk)
adj.
Phonemic.

pho•ne•mic

(fəˈni mɪk, foʊ-)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to phonemes: a phonemic system.
2. of or pertaining to phonemics.
3. concerning or involving the discrimination of distinctive speech elements of a language: a phonemic contrast.
[1930–35]
pho•ne′mi•cal•ly, adv.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"Text to Speech Conversion with Phonematic Concatenation", International Journal of Electronics Communication and Computer Technology (IJECCT) 2(5): 223-226.
Attention, cognitive flexibility, and impulse control are the attribute of executive function and can be tested using tests such as: Stroop Test, Trail Making Test A and B, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, phonematic fluency test (18).
Skora's essay analyses Abhinavagupta's notion of the Voice of the Infinite Other (paravac) in his discussion of phonematic cosmology in his Paratrimsikavivarana (The Long Commentary on the Thirty Verses Embodying the Other) and related texts.
The therapeutic techniques specific to each type of dyslalia have been determined, both to the general methods and procedures: gymnastics and myo-gymnastics of the body and of the organs participating in the pronunciation, breath education and the education of the balance between inspiration and expiration, education of the phonematic hearing, as well as the specific methods for the realisation of sound impostation, consolidation and automation, according to the general scheme of the speech therapy intervention.
In modernist poetry, the semiotic is visible in "the introduction into the linguistic order of an excess of pleasure marked by the redistribution of phonematic order, morphological structure, even syntax" (Revolution 80).
Neuropsychological characterization of phonematic integration in bilingual mexican children
(Saussure's error, Deleuze argues, was to have reduced this differential relation to a relation of opposition; Deleuze derives his understanding of linguistics from Gustave Guillaume.) (22) All these phonematic elements and relations coexist in the linguistic Idea, which is a completely differentiated and variable totality.
Infancy becomes, in this respect, an original state of pre-signification in which the disarticulation of words from their meanings individuates the existence of phonematic structures.
Kristeva asserts that the geno-text is a process that articulates ephemeral structures embedded in phonematic and melodic devices.
(50) The proper name is closer to the letter than to the symbolic proper: it approaches the unary trait by redoubling its operation, the idiotic in-difference of its count, and in this way guarantees the consistency of the structure of language, the differentially phonematic chain of signifiers.
The concept of genotext, based on psychoanalytic principles, encompasses all of a subject's corporeal and social relations (such as the energy and disposition of bodily drives and familial relations as well as the melodic aspects of voice and the phonematic devices of speech such as rhyme).