phoneme


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pho·neme

 (fō′nēm′)
n.
The smallest phonetic unit in a language that is capable of conveying a distinction in meaning, as the m of mat and the b of bat in English.

[French phonème, from Greek phōnēma, phōnēmat-, utterance, sound produced, from phōnein, to produce a sound, from phōnē, sound, voice; see bhā- in Indo-European roots.]

phoneme

(ˈfəʊniːm)
n
(Linguistics) linguistics one of the set of speech sounds in any given language that serve to distinguish one word from another. A phoneme may consist of several phonetically distinct articulations, which are regarded as identical by native speakers, since one articulation may be substituted for another without any change of meaning. Thus /p/ and /b/ are separate phonemes in English because they distinguish such words as pet and bet, whereas the light and dark /l/ sounds in little are not separate phonemes since they may be transposed without changing meaning
[C20: via French from Greek phōnēma sound, speech]

pho•neme

(ˈfoʊ nim)

n.
any of the minimal units of speech sound in a language that can serve to distinguish one word from another: The (p) of pit and the (b) of bit are considered two different phonemes, while the unaspirated (p) of spin and the aspirated (p) of pin are not. Compare allophone.
[1890–95; < French phonème < Greek phṓnēma sound <phōneîn to make a sound (derivative of phonḗ sound, voice)]

phoneme

- A word for a hallucination in which voices are heard.
See also related terms for heard.

phoneme

Any of the speech sounds in a language that convey a difference in meaning.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phoneme - (linguistics) one of a small set of speech sounds that are distinguished by the speakers of a particular language
linguistics - the scientific study of language
speech sound, phone, sound - (phonetics) an individual sound unit of speech without concern as to whether or not it is a phoneme of some language
allophone - (linguistics) any of various acoustically different forms of the same phoneme
Translations
häälik
foneemi
fonem
fonéma
foneem
fonem

phoneme

[ˈfəʊniːm] Nfonema m

phoneme

[ˈfəʊniːm] nphonème mphone number nnuméro m de téléphonephone tap nécoute f téléphonique
He assured them that ministers were not subjected to phone taps → Il leur a assuré que les ministres n'étaient pas placés sous écoute téléphonique.phone tapping nécoutes fpl téléphoniques

phoneme

nPhonem nt

phoneme

[ˈfəʊniːm] n (Ling) → fonema m
References in periodicals archive ?
In section 4 we will study their phoneme frequency distributions, and finally in section 5 there will be some concluding remarks.
com)-- The California-based edtech publisher Colvard Learning (CL) is offering its early literacy software programs—Pup's Quest for Phonics[R] and Professor Pup's Phoneme Farm[R]—to any Utah school wishing to try out CL apps through the end of this year.
11 As a result the phoneme that is adjacent to a phoneme that bears elongated feature, changes its place and sometimes a non-local change takes place.
A class of native or non-native pronunciation for a particular phoneme was assigned if at least three of the judges agreed on the same label.
Thus, there is a need to use a larger number of subjects, considering the syllabic structure in which the phoneme is.
One of the possible phonetically distinct articulations of a phoneme within the sound pattern of a language.
This multidisciplinary project examines the mechanisms in the mind and brain that underpin phoneme binding.
In the development of phonological skills, there is a gradual progression beginning with the ability to manipulate words, followed by syllable manipulation, and finally phoneme manipulation.
In this type of model, there is an assumption that each phoneme has an intrinsic duration which is inherently one of the distinctive features of phonemes.
How many different spellings can one phoneme or sound have?
Results of the study indicate three of the four participants made substantial gains in phoneme segmentation fluency.
He also defines and discusses phonemic idiosyncrasy, or the existence of sets--usually pairs--of phones that are allophones of the same phoneme in one language and distinct phonemes in another.