phonemicization

phonemicization

(fəʊˌniːmɪsaɪˈzeɪʃən) or

phonemicisation

n
1. (Phonetics & Phonology) a grouping of phonemes
2. (Phonetics & Phonology) an explanation of sounds with reference to phonemes
3. (Phonetics & Phonology) a transcription of sounds with reference to phonemes
4. (Phonetics & Phonology) the progression of an allophone to the level of a phoneme
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Within the American Structuralist tradition the more 'rigorous' Bloomfieldians made no commitments to the psychologically real (as opposed to analytically useful) nature of phonemes, and Twaddell is famous for arguing that any attempt to speculate about the contents of the mind was akin to kindling 'a fire in a wooden stove' (Twaddell, 1935: 9) but Kenneth Pike, from a competing group of structuralists (and one of Sapir's students) argued against the classic Trager-Smith phonemicization of American English in part because he found it very difficult to get linguistics students to understand the vowel system Bloch/Trager/Smith proposed (Pike, 1947).
The paper concludes that the phonemicization upon which the standardized version of orthography is based is not an unreasonable one.