phonology

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Related to phonologies: phonological

pho·nol·o·gy

 (fə-nŏl′ə-jē, fō-)
n. pl. pho·nol·o·gies
1. The study of speech sounds in language or a language with reference to their distribution and patterning and to tacit rules governing pronunciation.
2. The sound system of a language: the phonology of English.

pho·no·log′ic (fō′nə-lŏj′ĭk), pho′no·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
pho′no·log′i·cal·ly adv.
pho·nol′o·gist n.

phonology

(fəˈnɒlədʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
1. (Phonetics & Phonology) the study of the sound system of a language or of languages in general. Compare syntax1, syntax2, semantics
2. (Phonetics & Phonology) such a sound system
phonological, ˌphonoˈlogic adj
ˌphonoˈlogically adv
phoˈnologist n

pho•nol•o•gy

(fəˈnɒl ə dʒi, foʊ-)

n., pl. -gies.
1. the study of the distribution and patterning of speech sounds in a language and of the tacit rules governing pronunciation.
2. the phonological system or the body of phonological facts of a language.
[1790–1800]
pho•no•log•i•cal (ˌfoʊn lˈɒdʒ ɪ kəl) pho`no•log′ic, adj.
pho`no•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
pho•nol′o•gist (-dʒɪst) n.

phonology

1. the study of speech sounds, from either or both the phonetic and phonemic viewpoints.
2. the phonetic and phonemic systems of a language. See also linguistics. — phonologist, n. — phonological, adj.
See also: Sound
1. the study of the history and theory of sound changes in a language or in two or more languages comparatively.
2. the phonetics and phonemics of a language at a stated time; synchronic phonology. — phonologist, n. — phonological, adj.
See also: Linguistics
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phonology - the study of the sound system of a given language and the analysis and classification of its phonemes
linguistics - the scientific study of language
orthoepy - a term formerly used for the part of phonology that dealt with the `correct' pronunciation of words and its relation to `correct' orthography
descriptive linguistics - a description (at a given point in time) of a language with respect to its phonology and morphology and syntax and semantics without value judgments
syncopation, syncope - (phonology) the loss of sounds from within a word (as in `fo'c'sle' for `forecastle')
Translations
فونولوجيا
fonologie
fonologio
fonologia
fonologija
音韻学
fonologija

phonology

[fəʊˈnɒlədʒɪ] Nfonología f

phonology

[fəʊˈnɒlədʒi] nphonologie f

phonology

n (= science)Phonologie f; (= system)Lautsystem nt

phonology

[fəʊˈnɒlədʒɪ] n (Ling) → fonologia
References in periodicals archive ?
We can see, for example, that Australian and Austronesian languages tend to have simpler phonologies, that North American languages tend to have more complex morphologies, that Indo-European languages tend to have more complex levels of syntax, and that major languages tend to have a simpler lexicon (but a more complex phonology).
Scientifically, however, underlying categories and principles of signed languages have been shown to be relevantly analogous to those of spoken language phonologies to such an extent that semantic concern about the term has become irrelevant.
He shows how the comparative method was used to reconstruct the Proto-Indo-European phonological system and then proceeds to provide sketches of Proto-Kartvelian, Proto-Afrasian, Proto-Uralic, Proto-Dravidian, Proto-Altaic, and Proto-Nostratic phonologies.
These volumes are the long-awaited follow-up to Alan Kaye's Phonologies of Asia and Africa (Eisenbrauns, 1997).
We take this research (and ours) to its logical conclusion, arguing that it applies to more abstract phonological categories and adult phonologies as well.