phonology

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pho·nol·o·gy

 (fə-nŏl′ə-jē, fō-)
n. pl. pho·nol·o·gies
1. The study of speech sounds in language or a language with reference to their distribution and patterning and to tacit rules governing pronunciation.
2. The sound system of a language: the phonology of English.

pho·no·log′ic (fō′nə-lŏj′ĭk), pho′no·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
pho′no·log′i·cal·ly adv.
pho·nol′o·gist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

phonology

(fəˈnɒlədʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
1. (Phonetics & Phonology) the study of the sound system of a language or of languages in general. Compare syntax1, syntax2, semantics
2. (Phonetics & Phonology) such a sound system
phonological, ˌphonoˈlogic adj
ˌphonoˈlogically adv
phoˈnologist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pho•nol•o•gy

(fəˈnɒl ə dʒi, foʊ-)

n., pl. -gies.
1. the study of the distribution and patterning of speech sounds in a language and of the tacit rules governing pronunciation.
2. the phonological system or the body of phonological facts of a language.
[1790–1800]
pho•no•log•i•cal (ˌfoʊn lˈɒdʒ ɪ kəl) pho`no•log′ic, adj.
pho`no•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
pho•nol′o•gist (-dʒɪst) n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

phonology

1. the study of speech sounds, from either or both the phonetic and phonemic viewpoints.
2. the phonetic and phonemic systems of a language. See also linguistics. — phonologist, n. — phonological, adj.
See also: Sound
1. the study of the history and theory of sound changes in a language or in two or more languages comparatively.
2. the phonetics and phonemics of a language at a stated time; synchronic phonology. — phonologist, n. — phonological, adj.
See also: Linguistics
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phonology - the study of the sound system of a given language and the analysis and classification of its phonemes
linguistics - the scientific study of language
orthoepy - a term formerly used for the part of phonology that dealt with the `correct' pronunciation of words and its relation to `correct' orthography
descriptive linguistics - a description (at a given point in time) of a language with respect to its phonology and morphology and syntax and semantics without value judgments
syncopation, syncope - (phonology) the loss of sounds from within a word (as in `fo'c'sle' for `forecastle')
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
فونولوجيا
fonologie
fonologio
fonologia
fonologija
音韻学
fonologija

phonology

[fəʊˈnɒlədʒɪ] Nfonología f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

phonology

[fəʊˈnɒlədʒi] nphonologie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

phonology

n (= science)Phonologie f; (= system)Lautsystem nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

phonology

[fəʊˈnɒlədʒɪ] n (Ling) → fonologia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Hymen and Plank sent out a call for linguists who define themselves and are perceived first and foremost as phonologists to write on typology from a phonological perspective--thus crossing two areas of linguistics that rarely interact.
Knowledge of the rhymes was essential for writing and appreciating regularized verse; accordingly, phonologists spent much time on them.
Phoneticians and phonologists have long worked hard to understand the correct phonetic definitions of phonological features.
(3) Indeed, over the past decades, theory of verse has largely become a province of phonologists, while linguistics at large has moved closer to cognitive science and away from the study of literary forms and their evolution.
Phonologists define aspiration as a delay in onset time, or alternatively as sound production with open vocal folds.
8), including phonologists and linguists, and the impact of these discourses on patriotic schemes for public education; section three shows "how the pressure to conform to one model of English meter and English national identification produced fractures in the poetic-national identity of soldier poets in particular and, more broadly, reactionary misunderstandings about English metrical cultures for poets associated with the modernist avant-garde" (p.
There are phonologists who do not admit their existence at all or treat these as anomalous.
Phonologists have different views on the syllabification of a language in terms of marking the syllable boundary.
European and American linguists, particularly phonologists, explore how the three pillars--context, function, and communication--can support future research in prosody, which considers the role of pitch, accent, and other characteristics of the voice in speech.
For the last few years phonologists have been able to appreciate the merit of Gussmann's (2007) seminal The Phonology of Polish and now morphologists have an opportunity to delve into the morphological meanderings and to have a feel of the patterns of Polish word-formation (p.
It's the usual practice of phonologists to analyze the abstract sound-structures of a specific language or dialect, often in wider context of comparative purview; the smallest units of scrutiny are probably sub-group communities like creolized or immigrant populations, the sound world of young children learning a native speech, or the non-sound world of sign language used by deaf people.