phormium

(redirected from phormiums)

phormium

(ˈfɔːmɪəm)
n
(Plants) any plant of the New Zealand bulbous genus Phormium, with leathery evergreen leaves and red or yellow flowers in panicles
[New Latin, from Greek phormos a basket (from a use for the fibres)]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
They're underplanted with fine-leafed sheep fescue (Festuca filiformis) and 'Yellow Wave' phormiums.
Phormiums and cordylines with their sword-like foliage will contrast with round, bush-like shapes of Hypericum hidcote and ball-trimmed box plants (buxus).
Say a couple of architectural phormiums in the centre surrounded by lavenders and red hot pokers, then cineraria (for silvery contrast), with bedding plants around the outside to provide some bright colours.This would not only look nicer but last much longer, reducing the cost of replacement.
Phormiums, or New Zealand Flax as it is commonly known, throws up these great long flowering shoots - you don't need to cut them down but you can if you wish, to tidy the appearance of the shrub.
Phormiums, or New Zealand Flax as it is commonly know, throws up these great long flowering shoots - you don't need to cut them down but you can if you wish, to tidy the appearance of the shrub.
The soft mound shapes need partners with strong outlines, such as phormiums or irises.
NEW Zealand flax or Phormiums make a statement in the garden and look at home in a variety of different planting schemes.
Phormiums (New Zealand flax) are drought tolerant, wind tolerant and will happily grow in coastal conditions.
glenhirstcactiandpalms.co.uk - 01205 820314) DRAMATIC LOOK Phormiums (New Zealand Flag) can give your garden a really dramatic look.
Pull off the dead outer leaves of phormiums and divide overcrowded clumps.
Top growth on plants such as cordylines, phormiums and some evergreens may wilt, blacken and appear dead.
Good plant partners include those with a strong architectural outline, such as tall alliums, irises and phormiums. Hardy geraniums are generally trouble-free, but can be cut back in mid-summer if they start to look tatty and may flower again.