phoronomy


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phoronomy

kinematics.
See also: Motion
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their own phoronomy, seeming to know they must keep moving, with Kantian
He provides a careful and deliberate exposition following Kant's own order of argument; hence the book is divided into four main chapters, devoted in turn to Kant's Phoronomy, Dynamics, Mechanics, and Phenomenology.
In the "Phoronomy" of the Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science (1786) Kant again confirms that the left-right distinction, because it is inexplicable, provides a "good proof |Beweisgrund^" for the claim that space is not a property of things-in-themselves, but rather a subjective form of our sensory intuition of things (AA IV, 483-84).
(56) Kant's first explication of matter in the "Metaphysical foundations of phoronomy" is: "matter is the movable in space.
The work consists of a programmatic Preface followed by four chapters in which Kant presents the constituents of the concept of matter as "something that is to be an object of the outer senses." (55) In the Phoronomy chapter Kant investigates the concept of motion as a space-time quantity; in the Dynamics he considers the filling of a space as a quality of outer perception; in the Mechanics chapter the concepts of certain spatial and dynamical relations are introduced; and in the fourth and final Phenomenology chapter he examines the concept of motion, treating it as a modality of the cognition of matter.
This is why Kant's phoronomy does not allow us to determine the existence of a single motion in nature, but has as its "sole principle" a thesis concerning the manner in which the (empirically given) motion of a body may be represented as a composite of two or more motions.(87) (In effect, the Phoronomy is devoted to defining an exponent.)
The implications of the empirical status of motion reach beyond the phoronomy chapter.
The Phoronomy and the Mechanics do not determine the existence of a single motion in nature but only provide rules for the mathematical construction of motions, in the first case, and the (idealized) deduction of consequent motions from antecedent (empirically given) motions, in the second.(103) The Dynamics only tells us that all bodies must exert repulsive and attractive forces; it does not tell us how strong these forces are, whether the proportion of the one to the other can vary in different kinds of body, and if so, how many such different kinds of body there might actually be in nature.
To construct a repulsive force is just to represent the motion of a second body as a composite of two opposed motions in accord with the procedure set out in Kant's phoronomy. The one motion is the motion of the body considered on its own; the other is the motion due to the repulsive force of the repelling body.
Accordingly, they provide a substantial overview of the Phoronomy, Dynamics, Mechanics, and Phenomenology (together with an intriguing account of their interdependence).