phospholipase

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phos·pho·lip·ase

 (fŏs′fō-lĭp′ās′, -lī′pās′)
n.
Any of several enzymes that hydrolyze specific ester bonds in phospholipids.

phospholipase

(ˌfɒsfəʊˈlaɪpeɪs)
n
(Chemistry) chem an enzyme that converts phospholipids into fatty acids and other substances as they react with water
References in periodicals archive ?
2014) The adipocyte-inducible secreted phospholipases PLA2G and PLA2G2E play distinct roles in obesity.
Phospholipases are one of key enzymes in oil refinery industry and play a crucial role in degumming of edible oils.
Basidiomycete yeasts of the genus Malassezia are lipophilic, unipolar, and budding yeasts characterized by a thick cell wall with high lipid content, an incomplete fatty acid synthesis metabolic pathway, and dependence on a variety of extracellular enzymes such as lipases, phospholipases, and acid sphingomyelinases for survival.
proteases, phospholipases and hemolysins), phenotypic switching and thigmotropism are the commonly known virulence factors.
3 Phospholipases are another group of enzymes that contribute to the pathogencity of C.
This action was attributed to the effect of different venom toxins such as myotoxins cytotoxins phospholipases and cardiotoxins (Rahmy 2001).
In vitro secretion of proteinases and phospholipases was evaluated by plate assay containing BSA and egg yolk respectively.
Phospholipases A2 (PLA2) are a family of key enzymes in the metabolism of membrane phospholipids, which catalyse the hydrolysis of fatty acid at the sn-2 position of phospholipids.
The ability of Candida to persist within the host and to cause infection has also been attributed to its capacity to grow in a range of physiological extremes, to produce hydrolytic enzymes (proteinases such as aspartyl proteinases, phospholipases, and hemolysins), the reversible transition between unicellular yeast and filamentous growth, and phenotypic switching (CALDERONE; FONZI, 2001; SILVA et al.
The calcium-dependent phospholipases they begin to activate.
Snake venoms consist of pharmacologically active components including enzymes, such as acetylcholinesterases, L-amino acid oxidases, serine proteinases, metalloproteinases, and phospholipases, and nonenzymatic proteins used for immobilization and digestion of prey.