phosphorescence


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phos·pho·res·cence

 (fŏs′fə-rĕs′əns)
n.
1. Persistent emission of light following exposure to and removal of incident radiation.
2. Emission of light without appreciable heat, as from chemiluminescence of phosphorus or bioluminescence of living organisms.

phos′pho·res′cent adj.
phos′pho·res′cent·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

phosphorescence

(ˌfɒsfəˈrɛsəns)
n
1. (General Physics) physics
a. a fluorescence that persists after the bombarding radiation producing it has stopped
b. a fluorescence for which the average lifetime of the excited atoms is greater than 10–8 seconds
2. (General Physics) the light emitted in phosphorescence
3. (Chemistry) the emission of light during a chemical reaction, such as bioluminescence, in which insufficient heat is evolved to cause fluorescence. Compare fluorescence
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

phos•pho•res•cence

(ˌfɒs fəˈrɛs əns)

n.
1. the property of being luminous at temperatures below incandescence, as from slow oxidation or after exposure to light or other radiation.
2. a luminous appearance resulting from this.
3. any luminous radiation emitted from a substance after the removal of the exciting agent.
phos`pho•res′cent, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

phos·pho·res·cence

(fŏs′fə-rĕs′əns)
1. The giving off of light by a substance as a result of having absorbed energy from a form of electromagnetic radiation, such as visible light or x-rays. Unlike fluorescence, phosphorescence continues for a short while after the source of radiation is removed. Compare fluorescence.
2. The light produced in this way.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

phosphorescence

The emission of light by an object, and the persistence of this emission over long periods, following irradiation by light or other forms of radiation.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phosphorescence - a fluorescence that persists after the bombarding radiation has ceased
fluorescence - light emitted during absorption of radiation of some other (invisible) wavelength
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

phosphorescence

[ˌfɒsfəˈresns] Nfosforescencia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

phosphorescence

[ˌfɒsfəˈrɛsəns] nphosphorescence f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

phosphorescence

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

phosphorescence

[ˌfɒsfəˈrɛsns] nfosforescenza
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Whilst all the landscape was in neutral shade his companion's face, which was the focus of his eyes, rising above the mist stratum, seemed to have a sort of phosphorescence upon it.
Sometimes I tried to pierce the intense darkness that was only dispelled by the phosphorescence caused by our movements.
A man floundered near me, in a splutter of phosphorescence. I tried to help him, and in an instant he had me wildly round the neck.
While this pallidness was burning aloft, few words were heard from the enchanted crew; who in one thick cluster stood on the forecastle, all their eyes gleaming in that pale phosphorescence, like a far away constellation of stars.
The doctor's voice could scarcely be heard by his companions; but they could see his countenance calm as ever even amid the flashing of the lightnings; he was watching the phenomena of phosphorescence produced by the fires of St.
We all followed his movements with our eyes, for undoubtedly some nervousness was growing on us, and we saw a whole mass of phosphorescence, which twinkled like stars.
As the sun went down, the gale freshened into an absolute hurricane, and the ocean beneath was clearly visible on account of its phosphorescence. The wind was from the East all night, and gave us the brightest omen of success.
Many men have been praised as vividly imaginative on the strength of their profuseness in indifferent drawing or cheap narration:-- reports of very poor talk going on in distant orbs; or portraits of Lucifer coming down on his bad errands as a large ugly man with bat's wings and spurts of phosphorescence; or exaggerations of wantonness that seem to reflect life in a diseased dream.
I leaned over and watched the play of his feet, growing dim and dimmer, as they stirred the wan phosphorescence into ghostly fires.
True, he had beheld shooting stars (this in reply to Bassett's contention); but likewise had he beheld the phosphorescence of fungoid growths and rotten meat and fireflies on dark nights, and the flames of wood- fires and of blazing candle-nuts; yet what were flame and blaze and glow when they had flamed and blazed and glowed?
Excursion to Colonia del Sacramiento -- Value of an Estancia -- Cattle, how counted -- Singular Breed of Oxen -- Perforated Pebbles -- Shepherd Dogs -- Horses broken-in, Gauchos riding -- Character of Inhabitants -- Rio Plata -- Flocks of Butterflies -- Aeronaut Spiders -- Phosphorescence of the Sea -- Port Desire -- Guanaco -- Port St.
The walls of the houses were wet, the mud of the roadway glistened with an effect of phosphorescence, and when he emerged into the Strand out of a narrow street by the side of Charing Cross Station the genius of the locality assimilated him.