photocatalysis

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photocatalysis

(ˌfəʊtəʊkəˈtælɪsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-siːz)
(Chemistry) the alteration of the rate of a chemical reaction by light or other electromagnetic radiation

photocatalysis

The speeding up or slowing of a chemical reaction by light.
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References in periodicals archive ?
pH is an optimizing factor that influences the degradation of dye in the presence of photocatalyst (TiO2) or H2O2.
By the above features it is the most commonly used photocatalyst and it is currently used as degrader of organic molecules in the water purification process.
However, various approaches have been proposed to improve the UV-PCO efficiency through photocatalyst modification various doping, use of more effective coating technologies and substrates, and so on.
This is compared to using photocatalyst material, as is, with photoreactive electrodes that produce electricity and oxygen through the interaction of sunlight and water, used in artificial photosynthesis (1).
2]) is a promising photocatalyst for use in food safety applications.
In theory, the photocatalyst absorbs photons of ultraviolet or visible light to cause oxidation and reduction reactions on the catalyst's surface.
Although photocatalysts have already been used in air purification purposes, the combination of this method with a material able to form complex with pollutants is the innovation in this research, which significantly increases the activity of the photocatalyst.
All the experiments were performed under the same experimental conditions such as sunlight irradiation (between 9 am and 3 pm), constant temperature, pH and photocatalyst load etc.
As the most promising photocatalyst, titania materials (Ti[O.
2] in ml) dramatically increased in presence of ZnO photocatalyst nanoparticles and the LED UV-A lamp.
The reduction of CO2 by the process of artificial photosynthesis is believed to be one of alternative that emits oxygen, using atmospheric CO 2 and water in presence of photocatalyst [3].