photocurrent

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pho·to·cur·rent

 (fō′tō-kûr′ənt, -kŭr′-)
n.
An electric current produced by illumination of a photoelectric material.

photocurrent

(ˈfəʊtəʊˌkʌrənt)
n
(General Physics) an electric current produced by electromagnetic radiation in the photoelectric effect, photovoltaic effect, or photoconductivity

pho•to•cur•rent

(ˈfoʊ toʊˌkɜr ənt, -ˌkʌr-)

n.
an electric current produced by a photoelectric effect.
[1910–15]
References in periodicals archive ?
In Section 4, we analyze the system performance using the photocurrents of the photodiodes to determine the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the BER.
3]-ITO slides photocurrents were measured in a three-electrode photoelectrochemical cell under irradiation with a Xenon lamp before and after modification with enediol ligands baring different pendant chemical groups.
Since maximum emission intensities give maximum photocurrents at Diode Array detector, to sense these ones and control spectrum acquisition, we used the moment when the result of I derivate of photocurrents' sum (determined by the integration of photocurrents' sum [summation][I.
The scintillation light from the CsI detectors is converted to current signals using vacuum photodiodes (VPD), and the photocurrents are converted to voltages and amplified by solid-state electronics [7].
Absorbed radiation generates two photocurrents proportional to the wavelength of the incident light.
Analyzing the photocurrents of the different segments gives the light spot position.
The photocurrents are measured in a standard three-electrode cell before and after surface modification.
However, the proportionality constant connecting the photocurrents to the beam current may vary by a percent or more over an hour due to heating of optics, variations in the synchrotron beam position, etc.
The ratios of these photocurrents as a function of the angular position of the movable electron spectrometer provided the data necessary to determine the polarization of the light.