photonovel


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photonovel

(ˈfəʊtəʊˌnɒvəl)
n
(Journalism & Publishing) a story, usually based on a film or TV episode, consisting of chronological photographs or film stills with dialogue enclosed in balloons, as in the style of a comic book
Translations
photoroman
References in periodicals archive ?
Labor and class struggle are key issues in This Ain't China: A Photonovel, 1974, in which fragments of fictional narratives are suggested by paired and gridded photographs of workers at a fast-food restaurant (including Sekula himself), who alternately work busily, pose for the camera, daydream, and scheme against their employer, who is represented by a man in shades, sitting behind a desk and obscured by shadows.
One year after the publication of Andre Breton's novel Nadja the Finnish author Hagar Olsson published her novel In the Kanaan Express Train (1929), a caleidoscopical composition, which "Knut Brynhildsvoll has called a photonovel." (Holmstrom 105) Both novels are remarkable because they include photos in the running text.
Whether he finds himself swept along in an occupation, rallies the "proletariat" with an improvised speech that unfolds into a motivational exercise, sympathizes with the Evita depicted in a photonovel, or makes a narrow escape from the police, MarronA[c] emerges as a fascinating character whose intelligence combines with luck.
To illustrate the difference, they compare two versions of the photonovel: the intermedial and the monomedial.
Some other terms that are used to describe this technique are photo novella, foto novella, and photonovel (Wang & Burris, 1997; Weaks, 1976).
To address this gap, we developed a photonovel, which is like a comic book with photographs, using a community-based participatory process.
This AIDS education photonovel is designed to convey AIDS prevention information to young black and Latino teens.
However, he never left the theater, going at it for three full years, learning from the masters, who had connections with "Fotonovelas," romantic photonovels consisting of still photographs and captions, often starring well-known television and movie stars.
The examples used to illustrate the difference are two versions of photonovels. In this way, they are able to distinguish intermedial (multimodal) photonovels, popular in many French- and Spanish-speaking countries and where photographs are arranged in sequence and combined with words presented in captions or speech balloons and that work similarly to television soap-operas and monomedial photonovels where the photo-sequences lack word-captions or speech balloons and images lay exposed to readers' interpretation.
The authors distinguish between intermedial (multimodal) photonovels, popular in many French- and Spanish-speaking countries, and where photographs are arranged in sequence and combined with words presented in captions or speech balloons, and which work similarly to television soap operas, and monomedial photonovels, where the photo-sequences lack word-captions or speech balloons, and images lay exposed to readers' interpretation.
Rudd & Adolescents were empowered Comings, to develop their own 1994 health education materials (photonovels).