photophone


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photophone

(ˈfəʊtəʊˌfəʊn)
n
(General Physics) physics a device for the communication of sound on a beam of light. Used to transmit the first ever wireless telephone messages.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The PhotoPhone comes with 8 dedicated big speed dial buttons which can feature pictures or icons.
IDM3008 Check our site for a wide range of Big Button Desk Phones, Mobile Phones, TV Listeners , Hearing Amplifiers and much more The Big Button Phone Store Markettown.ie/mirroroffers PhotoPhone Amplified Big Button Telephone A telephone with a brilliant but simple solution for children or older people who struggle to remember telephone numbers.
Bell, "The photophone", Journal of the Franklin Institute, vol.
In 1880, the noted inventor Alexander Graham Bell created a device called a 'photophone' which could transmit voice communications using light, which was demonstrated to work over distances as much as 200m.
The third part of the piece is a text by Bridle, in which he delivers an equally speculative and convincing history of "cloud thinking," ranging from the development of the photophone to the latest efforts in weather control by rain-cloud seeding.
Zero.1 CEO Fleschen said: "It was Alexander Graham Bell who transmitted the first wireless telephone message on his a "photophone" in the 1800s.
Alexander Graham Bell not only developed and built the first telephone system, but went on to invent the photophone, which transmitted words along a beam of light; similar to mobile phone technology used today 100 years later!
The photoconductivity of selenium found its use in a photometer by Siemens, 1875, a photophone by Graham Bell, 1880, an optophone by Fourniere d'Albe, 1912 and then talking films in 1921 [61].
Alfred Hitchcock's Blackmail (1929), credited with being the first sound film in the United Kingdom, was recorded using the sound-on-disc technology of the RCA Photophone. See Douglas Gomery, The Coming of Sound: A History (New York, 2005).