photoproduct

(redirected from photoproducts)

pho·to·prod·uct

 (fō′tō-prŏd′əkt)
n.
The product of a photochemical reaction.

photoproduct

(ˈfəʊtəʊˌprɒdʌkt)
n
(Chemistry) chem any product which is produced by a chemical reaction that uses light or other electromagnetic radiation to increase energy of particles
References in periodicals archive ?
(4.) Kobayashi et al (1998) Supra-nuclear melanin caps reduce UV-induced DNA photoproducts in human epidermis J.
Asahi Photoproducts will be displaying its full array of flexographic plates and plate technology at Labelexpo Europe.
In addition, Peters reported that Wikoff Color signed an agreement with Asahi Photoproducts to become a U.S.
It also reduced the production of damaging DNA photoproducts in cell cultures and in human skin.
Ultraviolet portion in sunlight is deleterious to the virus activity as it causes DNA and protein matrix degradations (Bandyopadhyay et al., 1999) by producing two types of pyrimidine dimers; cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and pyrimidine-pyrimidine 6-4 photoproducts (Friedberg et al., 1995).
du Pont de Nemours and Company, Dynamic Dies Incorporated, Eastman Kodak Company, Dantex Group, Fujifilm Corporation, JET Europe BV, Precision Rubber Plate Co., Inc., Luminite Products Corporation, Asahi Photoproducts Group, Schawk, Inc.
Photoproducts of tetracycline and oxytetracycline involving self-sensitized oxidation in aqueous solutions: effects of Ca2+ and Mg2+.
Incorporation of experimental compounds in fundamental state and photoproducts in Short-term in vitro cultures of P.
studied Irgacure 784 in an epoxy photopolymer and assumed that two absorptive photoproducts are generated during photoinitiation [25].
Disappearance of bands possibly can be designated as DNA damage through forming of photoproducts in DNA template, or deletion of DNA fragments, whereas new bands generally result in present mutations, large deletions, or homologous recombination [50,52].
Therefore, AhR ligands (e.g., dietary substances, tryptophan photoproducts, and environmental pollutants) have the potential to be involved both as tools for comprehending the role of the AhR in lung inflammation and as therapeutics for the treatment of various inflammatory lung diseases.
UV light is one of the powerful agents that can induce a variety of mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA lesions, such as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), 6-4 photoproducts (6-4PPs), and their Dewar valence isomers as well as DNA strand breaks (most of them single-strand breaks) by interfering the genome integrity [22].