photoreceptor


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pho·to·re·cep·tor

 (fō′tō-rĭ-sĕp′tər)
n.
1. A nerve ending, cell, or group of cells specialized to sense or receive light.
2. An electronic device that converts light energy into electrical signals.

photoreceptor

(ˌfəʊtəʊrɪˈsɛptə)
n
(Zoology) zoology physiol a light-sensitive cell or organ that conveys impulses through the sensory neuron connected to it

pho•to•re•cep•tor

(ˌfoʊ toʊ rɪˈsɛp tər)

n.
a membrane protein or end organ that is stimulated by light.
[1905–10]

pho·to·re·cep·tor

(fō′tō-rĭ-sĕp′tər)
A specialized structure or cell that is sensitive to light. In vertebrate animals, the photoreceptors are the rods and cones of the eye's retina. See Note at circadian rhythm.
Translations
photorécepteur
References in periodicals archive ?
Arshavsky, "Protein sorting, targeting and trafficking in photoreceptor cells," Progress in Retinal and Eye Research, vol.
Excessive light exposure leads to photoreceptor degeneration and several studies have suggested that a long-term history of exposure to light may have some impact on the incidence of age-related macular degeneration.
Photoreceptor damage was evaluated by measuring the outer nuclear layer thickness at 5days after light exposure and recording the electroretinogram (ERG).
A prospective observational study was carried out on 40 eyes of 40 patients (35 males and 5 females), age ranging from 26 to 51 years to evaluate the changes in macular photoreceptor layer using optical coherence tomography (OCT) in patients with central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) and correlate the loss of visual acuity.
These results demonstrate that gestational lead exposure resulting in blood lead levels of 10 [micro]g/dL alters retinal development by selectively promoting the development of rod photoreceptor cells and bipolar cells.
The new system mimics the complex behavior of photoreceptor cells, creating a more natural message for the ganglion cells to interpret.
In vertebrates, or animals with a backbone, like humans, the retina contains millions of light-sensitive photoreceptor cells shaped like rods, which work well in dim light, and cones, which detect colors.
However, in 2002 it was shown that there is an additional and previously unknown photoreceptor in the eye with peak wavelength sensitivity very close to the peak sensitivity of rod receptors.
Topics addressed include photoreceptor membrane conductance, how the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) regenerates 11-cis retinal, photoreceptor adaptation to various levels of illumination and the biochemical basis of this phenomenon as well as its psychophysical consequences, how the retina develops into its final structure, how signals are processed in the retinal synaptic layers, and how changes in the retina and RPE influence normal aging.
THE IMPORTANCE OF PARASYMPATHETIC REGULATION OF CHOROIDAL BLOOD FLOW FOR CONE PHOTORECEPTOR HEALTH IN PIGEONS.
Critics of Intelligent Design claim that the vertebrate eye shows poor design, compared to the octopus eye, because light in the former must pass through ganglion cells before reaching the photoreceptor cells at the back of the retina, whereas the latter has photoreceptors at the front of the retina, directly in the light path.
The mice treated had photoreceptor loss, which damages the retina.