photoresist


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Related to photoresist: photolithography

photoresist

(ˌfəʊtəʊrɪˈzɪst)
n
1. (Crafts) a material sensitive to light that is used in industrial processes such as the chemical etching of integrated circuits and in engraving
2. (Chemistry) a material sensitive to light that is used in industrial processes such as the chemical etching of integrated circuits and in engraving
References in periodicals archive ?
Global and Chinese Photoresist Industry, 2010-2020 Market Research Report is a comprehensive business intelligence study on the current state of the worldwide photoresists and its players with a specific focus on the Chinese market.
A photoresist is a photosensitive polymer material used in the manufacturing process of semiconductor devices.
But microstructures are often fabricated on photoresist layer as well as on silicon substrate.
Reflecting the trend toward production of electronic circuits with extremely small line widths, demand for high-quality high-purity cyclohexanone is expected to grow as cleaning agent for removal of photoresist.
The advancement of semiconductor technology correlates directly with the ability of photoresist companies to develop products that can be used to pattern circuits on silicon wafers at ever smaller dimensions.
The collapse of photoresist patterns in the production process is a problem stringently limiting the miniaturizing of microchips.
Following this, photoresist is spun-on the wafer and the wafer is soft baked.
His contributions to optical lithography and photoresist materials have played a major role in enabling the microelectronics revolution.
com) will sell its dry-film photoresist business to Eternal Chemical Co.
They project only all-or-nothing light patterns onto a photoresist, resulting in microstructures of uniform height.
The photoresist is hardened by exposure to light and then goes through several fabrication steps that uncover well-defined regions of the wafer surface and harden that surface to withstand subsequent fabrication steps.
Then they coat the glass with a photoresist, a compound that is sensitive to light (orange).