photorespiration


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pho·to·res·pi·ra·tion

 (fō′tō-rĕs′pə-rā′shən)
n.
Oxidation of carbohydrates in plants with the release of carbon dioxide during photosynthesis.

photorespiration

(ˌfəʊtəʊˌrɛspəˈreɪʃən)
n
(Botany) (in plants) a reaction that occurs during photosynthesis in which oxygen is assimilated and used to oxidize carbohydrates, with the release of carbon dioxide: differs from normal respiration in that there is no production of energy in the form of ATP
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In some models, it is the indirect effect of temperature on stomatal conductance that causes the highest decline in photosynthesis (Doughty & Goulden, 2008; Lloyd & Farquhar, 2008), but others showed that direct effects on photorespiration and photosynthetic machinery are more important (Galbraith et al.
In C3 photosynthesis pathway, the photorespiration is a major problem that reduces amount of dry matter production [14, 20, 28].
To construct accurate model predictions for soybean crops, some specific aspects, such as photorespiration and the CO2 assimilation rate, must be taken into consideration.
Libert and Franceschi (1987) suggested that photorespiration is not a prerequisite for oxalate synthesis.
2] increases rate of fixed carbon and also suppresses photorespiration.
The change in succinate dehydrogenase activity in different species may be because of the fact that change in the enzyme significantly affects the rate of TCA functioning and also the balance between photosynthesis, respiration and photorespiration in the cell (Popov et al, 2007).
They cover crop development and phenology, including case histories, the inception and use of solar radiation by the canopy, photosynthesis and photorespiration, the loss of carbon dioxide in respiration, the partitioning of dry matter to harvested organs, limiting factors and the achievement of high yields, the physiology of crop quality, the simulation modeling of groups (including models for wheat, soybeans and corn) and the future of crop physiology given climate change, lowering inputs, new crops and quality.
Her areas of specialization include the biochemistry of photorespiration in the unicellular eukaryotic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii; phylogenetic relationships between alpha-hydroxy acid metabolizing enzymes; regulation of chloroplast gene expression; the social impact of science and technology; and ethical considerations associated with science, technology, and the environment.