phototypesetting


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pho·to·type·set·ting

 (fō′tō-tīp′sĕt′ĭng)
n.
The preparation of manuscript for printing by the projection of images of type characters on photographic film, which is then used to make printing plates. Also called photocomposition.

phototypesetting

(ˌfəʊtəʊˈtaɪpˌsɛtɪŋ)
n
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) another word for photocomposition

phototypesetting

Typesetting using machines that superseded the old system of casting type from hot metal. Instead they create images of characters on photographic paper or film, which is then used for platemaking. The fastest can set 20,000 or more characters per second.
Translations

phototypesetting

[ˌfəʊtəʊˈtaɪpˌsetɪŋ] N (US) (Typ) → fotocomposición f
References in periodicals archive ?
At the same time, phototypesetting machines evolved out of the older mechanical systems.
Phototypesetting service of the National Press editions for the Official State Gazette Agency during 2014 (2 equal Lots)
In the time of phototypesetting, the computerization process was taken over by the big type foundries with the respective copyrights.
The ratings reflect Tp's strong market position in the printing business, steady revenues, established market position in the phototypesetting business, and above-average operating efficiency.
From a four-page black and white broadsheet created on linotype machines which cast type in full lines using hot lead by an army of printers, to the modern phototypesetting process printing full colour papers - from typewriters to computers, from horse-drawn carts to vans delivering the papers which can also be 'wired' out to all corners of the globe.
Beginning in the 1960s, hot type began to give way to cold type, which is technically neither cold nor type, but rather phototypesetting.
29) His volume ends without covering offset printing, phototypesetting, photocopying, or computer-generated texts.
My layout and phototypesetting skills are now completely obsolete; it's as though I learned to shoe horses.
Ever seeking better quality, though, Stryker immediately began lobbying for a move to a bigger press, and upgraded his own equipment from the composer to a fancy phototypesetting machine.
Founded in 1889 as a school for book printers with affiliations to type-setting and bookbinding, the establishment saw major changes with the switch from hot metal to phototypesetting.
Here the authors cover the progression of typography from hand composition through metal typecasting (Linotype and Monotype machines, for example) and on to digital phototypesetting.
Offset and phototypesetting, in contrast, did little or nothing to change newspapers' fundamental business model.