phrenologically

phrenologically

(frɛnəˈlɒdʒɪkəlɪ)
adv
(Complementary Medicine) in a manner relating to phrenology
References in classic literature ?
It is plain, then, that phrenologically the head of this Leviathan, in the creature's living intact state, is an entire delusion.
Whether it was, too, that his head being shaved, his forehead was drawn out in freer and brighter relief, and looked more expansive than it otherwise would, this I will not venture to decide; but certain it was his head was phrenologically an excellent one.
The pigeon-pie was not bad, but it was a delusive pie: the crust being like a disappointing head, phrenologically speaking: full of lumps and bumps, with nothing particular underneath.
Patients who had been examined phrenologically would be given a record of the size of their individual faculties and instruction on how to cultivate or curb them in relation to their overall harmonious development.
Critics have noted the influence of phrenology in the representation of Roderick Usher's appearance; for example, Usher's "large, liquid, and luminous" eyes, "ghastly pallor of the skin," and "hair of more than web-like softness and tenuity" all indicate a phrenologically "nervous" personality type.
If parts of Usher's appearance are phrenologically suitable for the artistic and intellectual pursuits in which he is subsequently engaged, still other traits convey physiognomic signs of decadence and moral decline.
It is plain, then, that phrenologically the head of this Leviathan, in the creature's living intact state, is an entire delusion.
Phrenology offers a further linguistic lesson: the commonplaces of the neurotic (such as the Oedipus Complex and the Freudian Slip), which have come into everyday language, may one day possibly go the way of Roderick Usher's expansive forehead, Melville's phrenologically challenged whale, and Whitman's alimentive mediums.
Quotations from Wagstaff in the exhibition's wall text boldly announced the sexiness of looking, specifically of looking at photographs: "Death fascinates me less than sex in photographs," or, even more pointedly, "[some] images allow you to linger, allow you to return again and again to a special mind-place that is sexy in the best sense of the word - emotional, intellectual, and sensual." In photography, Wagstaff discerned cruising's residue, "zeroing in on bodies and parts of bodies as sculpture, even in death, even phrenologically," as he remarked in a 1983 issue of Artforum.
But critics have had little to say about the other part of the body that could be examined -- the hand.(12) Nineteenth-century observers felt the hand to be fully saturated with information about its possessor's character; a book entitled The Hand Phrenologically Considered: Being a Glimpse at the Relation of the Mind with the Organisation of the Body (1848) exemplifies the Victorian investment in readings of the hand, the technicist discourse of the work enabling it to sidestep the dubiety of palmistry: