phrenology


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phre·nol·o·gy

 (frĭ-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The study of the shape and protuberances of the skull, based on the now discredited belief that they reveal character and mental capacity.

phren′o·log′ic (frĕn′ə-lŏj′ĭk, frē′nə-), phren′o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
phre·nol′o·gist n.

phrenology

(frɪˈnɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Medicine) (formerly) the branch of science concerned with localization of function in the human brain, esp determination of the strength of the faculties by the shape and size of the skull overlying the parts of the brain thought to be responsible for them
phrenological, phrenologic adj
phreˈnologist n

phre•nol•o•gy

(frɪˈnɒl ə dʒi, frɛ-)

n.
a system of character analysis based upon the belief that certain faculties and personality traits are indicated by the configurations of the skull.
[1815; < Greek phren-, s. of phrḗn mind + -o- + -logy]
phren•o•log•ic (ˌfrɛn lˈɒdʒ ɪk) phren`o•log′i•cal, adj.
phren`o•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
phre•nol′o•gist, n.

phre·nol·o·gy

(frĭ-nŏl′ə-jē)
The study of the shape of the skull as a means of determining character and intelligence. Phrenology has been disproven as a science.

phrenology

a system by which an analysis of character and of the development of faculties is attempted by studying the shape and protuberances of the skull. — phrenologist, n.phrenologic, phrenological, adj.
See also: Head

phrenology

1. The study of the shape of the human skull, especially with a view to determining character.
2. This pseudo-science developed in the 19th century and holds that certain characteristics—such as wit, normality, aggression or benevolence—are related to particular parts of the brain and can be recognized by bumps on the contour of the head.
3. Assessing character from the presence of bumps on the head, developed by F. J. Gall in the nineteenth century.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phrenology - a now abandoned study of the shape of skull as indicative of the strengths of different facultiesphrenology - a now abandoned study of the shape of skull as indicative of the strengths of different faculties
craniology - the scientific study of the skulls of various human races
Translations

phrenology

[frɪˈnɒlədʒɪ] Nfrenología f

phrenology

nPhrenologie f

phrenology

[frɪˈnɒlədʒɪ] nfrenologia
References in classic literature ?
Apply this spinal branch of phrenology to the Sperm Whale.
Crocus would that evening deliver a lecture on Phrenology for the benefit of the Belleville public; at a charge, for admission, of so much a head.
and unless I am very much mistaken, a good many people went to the lecture that night, who never thought about phrenology, or about Doctor Crocus either, in all their lives before.
Jour printer by trade; do a little in patent medi- cines; theater-actor -- tragedy, you know; take a turn to mesmerism and phrenology when there's a chance; teach singing-geography school for a change; sling a lecture sometimes -- oh, I do lots of things -- most anything that comes handy, so it ain't work.
Here our whole party, joining voices, detailed, at great length, the assumptions of phrenology and the marvels of animal magnetism.
Astronomy to the selfish becomes astrology; psychology, mesmerism (with intent to show where our spoons are gone); and anatomy and physiology become phrenology and palmistry.
It surveys the prehistory of neuro-enhancement with amphetamines or coffee, early experiments with electricity and magnetism, and the cult of phrenology.
Distributed neural systems: Beyond the new phrenology.
This belief isn't based on empirical evidence, but on a 19th-century hypothesis about free will that has more in common with phrenology than with our modern understanding of how brains work.
12) In the 1830s, after the collapse of the New Harmony experiment, the Owenites, with their educational concerns, thus found themselves drawn into such disparate movements as the freethinkers, phrenology, the Working Men's movement, and its successive political parties.
She summarizes the early history of medicine in the United States up to the establishment of the American Medical Association in 1847 (addressing such issues as the history of diagnostic practices, alternative medicine, fear of epidemics and live burial, homeopathy, mesmerism, phrenology, physiognomy, and animal magnetism), reviews the medical histories of both authors, and contextualizes each tale in relation to nineteenth-century medicine.
Unfortunately, it turned out to be phrenology (the European racist pseudoscience of physiognomy is meant, not the 19th century popular US self-improvement movement).