phylarch


Also found in: Wikipedia.

phylarch

(ˈfaɪlɑːk)
n
(Historical Terms) Greek history anthropol the chief of a tribe in Ancient Greece, and in Athens, the head of a clan in battle, or generally, the chief of a tribe
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Shahid rightly concludes that the references to Palmyra and an unidentified friendly phylarch in the seventh-century acta of St.
In addition to being a Nazarite, James was also a `distinguished member of the priesthood, because the two tribes were linked exclusively to one another ([GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), the royal tribe to the priestly one and the priestly to the royal, just as earlier, in the time of the Exodus, Nahshon the phylarch from Judah took as his wife the Elisheba of old, [the] daughter of Aaron (sic)'.(53)
6:23 identifies Elisheba as the daughter of Amminadab and sister of the Judahite phylarch Nahshon.
Anastasius the Persian and the phylarch might have been differently worded (pp.
One is Aspebetos, an Arab chieftain (not a Salihid) who deserted from Persian to Roman service in the 420s, converted to Christianity, was made phylarch in Provincia Arabia, and was in 427 consecrated as a bishop as well.
I suggest that there was, in fact, always a group of twelve leaders in Jerusalem, that they were first simply known as the Twelve, that they then quite naturally came to be known as the elders (a title which at least in some places in the LXX is closely associated, if not identified with, the twelve phylarchs in the wilderness story),(18) and that only in the memory of the church of the second and third generations did they become the apostles.