phyllody


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phyllody

(ˈfɪləʊdɪ)
n
(Botany) botany the abnormal development of flower parts into leaves, caused by a virus or infection

phyllody

the process by which floral organs turn into foliage. Also phyllomorphy.
See also: Flowers
the process by which floral organs turn into foliage. Also called phyllomorphy.
See also: Leaves
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the various diseases of China aster, phyllody disease is major constraint in flower yield and seed production.
Observations were recorded at 50, 60 and 70 days after transplanting with respect to phyllody disease incidence.
Ten leaf and stem samples showing symptoms of phyllody and stunting were collected from plants grown in Agricultural Research Station field Riyadh region Saudi Arabia during December 2011.
In the present study we observed stunted plants with shoe stringed leaves phyllody and aborted flowers produced by phytoplasmas-like agents under tropical conditions.
Transmission experiments on coconut lethal yellowing disease with Deltocephalus flavicosta Stal, a leafhopper vector of periwinkle phyllody in Jamaica.
Symptomatology, etiology and transmission of chickpea phyllody disease in Pakistan.
Natural occurrence of phytoplasma associated with chickpea phyllody disease in Pakistan - a new record.
Virus and virus like organisms, causing diseases such as mosaic, leaf curl and phyllody, have also been reported (Roy, 1931).
Chickpea productivity, however, remained virtually stagnant over recent decades because of its susceptibility to diseases such as Ascochyta blight, Fusarium wilt, Neocosmospora root rot, Macrophomina charcoal/collar rot and phyllody (Akhtar et al.
Hameed (2009) Symptomatology, etiology and transmission of chickpea phyllody disease in Pakistan.
This report deals with a case of phyllody, flower abnormality which is described as leaf-like development of the floral organs.
Phyllody, a report deals with a case of phyllody, flower abnormality which is described as leaf-like development of the floral organs (Meyer, 1966; Sim et al.