physiognomy

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Related to physiognomical: physiognomy, physiognomist

phys·i·og·no·my

 (fĭz′ē-ŏg′nə-mē, -ŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. phys·i·og·no·mies
1. Facial features.
2.
a. The art of judging human character from facial features.
b. Divination based on facial features.
3. Aspect and character of an inanimate or abstract entity: the physiognomy of New England.

[Middle English phisonomie, from Old French phisionomie, from Late Latin physiognōmia, from Greek phusiognōmiā, variant of phusiognōmoniā : phusio-, physio- + gnōmōn, gnōmon-, interpreter; see gnō- in Indo-European roots.]

phys′i·og·nom′ic (-ŏg-nŏm′ĭk, -ə-nŏm′ĭk), phys′i·og·nom′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
phys′i·og·nom′i·cal·ly adv.
phys′i·og′no·mist n.

physiognomy

(ˌfɪzɪˈɒnəmɪ)
n
1. a person's features or characteristic expression considered as an indication of personality
2. the art or practice of judging character from facial features
3. the outward appearance of something, esp the physical characteristics of a geographical region
[C14: from Old French phisonomie, via Medieval Latin, from Late Greek phusiognōmia, erroneous for Greek phusiognōmonia, from phusis nature + gnōmōn judge]
physiognomic, ˌphysiogˈnomical adj
ˌphysiogˈnomically adv
ˌphysiˈognomist n

phys•i•og•no•my

(ˌfɪz iˈɒg nə mi, -ˈɒn ə mi)

n., pl. -mies.
1. the face or countenance, esp. when considered as an index to the character.
2. the art of determining character or personal characteristics from the form or features of the body, esp. of the face.
[1350–1400; Middle English fis(e)namie, fisnomie < Middle French fisonomie < Medieval Latin phys(i)onomia < Late Greek physiognōmía, Greek physiognōmonía art of judging people by their features; see physio-, gnomon, -y3]
phys`i•og•nom′ic (-ɒgˈnɒm ɪk, əˈnɒm-) phys`i•og•nom′i•cal, adj.
phys`i•og•nom′i•cal•ly, adv.

physiognomy, physiognomics

1. the art of determining character or personal qualities from the features or form of the body, especially the face.
2. divination by examining the features of a face. — physiognomist, n. — physiognomic, physiognomical, adj.
See also: Facial Features

physiognomy

Character analysis using facial features.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.physiognomy - the human face (`kisser' and `smiler' and `mug' are informal terms for `face' and `phiz' is British)physiognomy - the human face (`kisser' and `smiler' and `mug' are informal terms for `face' and `phiz' is British)
human head - the head of a human being
face, human face - the front of the human head from the forehead to the chin and ear to ear; "he washed his face"; "I wish I had seen the look on his face when he got the news"
pudding face, pudding-face - a large fat human face
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom

physiognomy

noun face, features, look, clock (Brit. slang), dial (Brit. slang), countenance, visage, phiz (slang), phizog (slang) his thick black hair and bony Irish physiognomy

physiognomy

noun
An outward appearance:
Translations

physiognomy

[ˌfɪzɪˈɒnəmɪ] Nfisonomía f

physiognomy

n (= face)Physiognomie f; (= study)Physiognomik f; (fig)äußere Erscheinung, Aussehen nt; the physiognomy of the Labour Partydas Gesicht der Labour Party

physiognomy

[ˌfɪzɪˈɒnəmɪ] n (person's features) (Geog) → fisionomia; (art of judging character) → fisiognomia

phys·i·og·no·my

n. fisionomía, semblante, rasgos faciales.
References in classic literature ?
As on your physiognomical voyage you sail round his vast head in your jolly-boat, your noble conceptions of him are never insulted by the reflection that he has a nose to be pulled.
He renewed his mysterious physiognomical play, making at the same time a rapid tremulous movement in the air with his fingers.
The two men looked at each other, and Valentin indulged in another flash of physiognomical eloquence.
With that, and with an expression of face in which a great number of opposite ingredients, such as mischief, cunning, malice, triumph, and patient expectation, were all mixed up together in a kind of physiognomical punch, Miss Miggs composed herself to wait and listen, like some fair ogress who had set a trap and was watching for a nibble from a plump young traveller.
With an eye keen as that of a bird of prey, -- with a long aquiline nose, a finely cut mouth, which he generally kept open, or rather which was gaping like the edges of a wound, -- this man would have presented to Lavater, if Lavater had lived at that time, a subject for physiognomical observations which at the first blush would not have been very favourable to the person in question.
In like manner, his physiognomical expression seemed to teem with benignity.
But as in the case of the traditional physiognomical approach that interprets facial expressions as indications of the character of a person, Adorno's social physiognomy wants to decipher the faces of the new form of capitalism in order to have a glimpse into its total character.
The review shows that tropical forests in China resemble equatorial lowland rain forests in profile, physiognomical characteristics, and family composition.
Grinnell reads Shelley's "On the Medusa" as a critique of "normalizing" physiognomical regimes that purport to be able to discern an individual's moral interiority by means of a decipherable code imprinted on her face and skull.
statement, prompting physiognomical comparisons with Chaucers most
In "Subject of Passions: Charles Le Brun and the Emotions of Absolutism," Chloe Hogg restores Le Bruns physiognomical sketches of the passions to their original context, not as inspired by Descartes's Les Passions de lame but rather as modeled upon Le Bruns own history painting Les Reines de Perse aux pieds d'Alexandre, a scene of misperception, in which Alexander's favorite is mistaken for the king.
Lavater was particularly enthusiastic about silhouettes, and in his chapter entitled "On Shades" he states that he has obtained more physiognomical knowledge from silhouettes than from every other kind of portrait (275).