physiognomy

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Related to physiognomically: physiognomist, physiognomies

phys·i·og·no·my

 (fĭz′ē-ŏg′nə-mē, -ŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. phys·i·og·no·mies
1. Facial features.
2.
a. The art of judging human character from facial features.
b. Divination based on facial features.
3. Aspect and character of an inanimate or abstract entity: the physiognomy of New England.

[Middle English phisonomie, from Old French phisionomie, from Late Latin physiognōmia, from Greek phusiognōmiā, variant of phusiognōmoniā : phusio-, physio- + gnōmōn, gnōmon-, interpreter; see gnō- in Indo-European roots.]

phys′i·og·nom′ic (-ŏg-nŏm′ĭk, -ə-nŏm′ĭk), phys′i·og·nom′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
phys′i·og·nom′i·cal·ly adv.
phys′i·og′no·mist n.

physiognomy

(ˌfɪzɪˈɒnəmɪ)
n
1. a person's features or characteristic expression considered as an indication of personality
2. the art or practice of judging character from facial features
3. the outward appearance of something, esp the physical characteristics of a geographical region
[C14: from Old French phisonomie, via Medieval Latin, from Late Greek phusiognōmia, erroneous for Greek phusiognōmonia, from phusis nature + gnōmōn judge]
physiognomic, ˌphysiogˈnomical adj
ˌphysiogˈnomically adv
ˌphysiˈognomist n

phys•i•og•no•my

(ˌfɪz iˈɒg nə mi, -ˈɒn ə mi)

n., pl. -mies.
1. the face or countenance, esp. when considered as an index to the character.
2. the art of determining character or personal characteristics from the form or features of the body, esp. of the face.
[1350–1400; Middle English fis(e)namie, fisnomie < Middle French fisonomie < Medieval Latin phys(i)onomia < Late Greek physiognōmía, Greek physiognōmonía art of judging people by their features; see physio-, gnomon, -y3]
phys`i•og•nom′ic (-ɒgˈnɒm ɪk, əˈnɒm-) phys`i•og•nom′i•cal, adj.
phys`i•og•nom′i•cal•ly, adv.

physiognomy, physiognomics

1. the art of determining character or personal qualities from the features or form of the body, especially the face.
2. divination by examining the features of a face. — physiognomist, n. — physiognomic, physiognomical, adj.
See also: Facial Features

physiognomy

Character analysis using facial features.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.physiognomy - the human face (`kisser' and `smiler' and `mug' are informal terms for `face' and `phiz' is British)physiognomy - the human face (`kisser' and `smiler' and `mug' are informal terms for `face' and `phiz' is British)
human head - the head of a human being
face, human face - the front of the human head from the forehead to the chin and ear to ear; "he washed his face"; "I wish I had seen the look on his face when he got the news"
pudding face, pudding-face - a large fat human face
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom

physiognomy

noun face, features, look, clock (Brit. slang), dial (Brit. slang), countenance, visage, phiz (slang), phizog (slang) his thick black hair and bony Irish physiognomy

physiognomy

noun
An outward appearance:
Translations

physiognomy

[ˌfɪzɪˈɒnəmɪ] Nfisonomía f

physiognomy

n (= face)Physiognomie f; (= study)Physiognomik f; (fig)äußere Erscheinung, Aussehen nt; the physiognomy of the Labour Partydas Gesicht der Labour Party

physiognomy

[ˌfɪzɪˈɒnəmɪ] n (person's features) (Geog) → fisionomia; (art of judging character) → fisiognomia

phys·i·og·no·my

n. fisionomía, semblante, rasgos faciales.
References in classic literature ?
Physiognomically regarded, the Sperm Whale is an anomalous creature.
But the doctor was much the more respectable-looking man of the two; his baldness was more intellectual and benevolent; there was a delicacy and propriety in the pulpiness of his fat white chin, a bland bagginess in his unwhiskered cheeks, a reverent roughness about his eyebrows and a fullness in his lower eyelids, which raised him far higher, physiognomically speaking, in the social scale, than my old prison acquaintance.
The degradation of green oak or cork oak forest, at thermomediterranean and mesomediterranean belts, in subhumid or even humid bioclimate, resulted in plant communities dominated physiognomically by Calicotome spinosa, Ampelodesmos mauritanica, Genista tricuspidata subsp.
They are physiognomically diverse and have been treated in the literature under a range of different names, including Dry Plant Formations of South America (Sarmiento, 1975), Tropical Dry Forests (Murphy & Lugo, 1986), Dry Seasonal Forests of South America (Prado & Gibbs, 1993) and Seasonally Dry Tropical Forests (Prado, 2000; Pennington et al.
Tropical montane cloud forest (TMCF) is a physiognomically heterogeneous floristic group, composed of species with diverse biogeographic affinities and characterized by a persistent cloud-cover that envelops its vegetation (Williams-Linera 2007).
Most of the aforementioned terms have not been circumscribed in detail, neither floristically nor physiognomically.
The illustrations that her sister, Cassandra, drew for Jane's "History of England" in Volume the Second of the juvenilia, however, are physiognomically inspired by the text.
Both are physiognomically identical in terms of structural parameters (height of canopy, density and basal area), but deciduous forest occur in rocky soils, which are inefficient at retaining water (Oliveira-Filho & Ratter, 2002), and thus, the consequences of damming on these forests should be distinct.
Physiognomically similar vegetation occurs on north aspects, but includes Carex misandra (sedge) and Cassiope tetragona with Dryas octopetala white mountain-aven) (Fig.