physiognomy

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Related to physiognomies: augured, betokened

phys·i·og·no·my

 (fĭz′ē-ŏg′nə-mē, -ŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. phys·i·og·no·mies
1. Facial features.
2.
a. The art of judging human character from facial features.
b. Divination based on facial features.
3. Aspect and character of an inanimate or abstract entity: the physiognomy of New England.

[Middle English phisonomie, from Old French phisionomie, from Late Latin physiognōmia, from Greek phusiognōmiā, variant of phusiognōmoniā : phusio-, physio- + gnōmōn, gnōmon-, interpreter; see gnō- in Indo-European roots.]

phys′i·og·nom′ic (-ŏg-nŏm′ĭk, -ə-nŏm′ĭk), phys′i·og·nom′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
phys′i·og·nom′i·cal·ly adv.
phys′i·og′no·mist n.

physiognomy

(ˌfɪzɪˈɒnəmɪ)
n
1. a person's features or characteristic expression considered as an indication of personality
2. the art or practice of judging character from facial features
3. the outward appearance of something, esp the physical characteristics of a geographical region
[C14: from Old French phisonomie, via Medieval Latin, from Late Greek phusiognōmia, erroneous for Greek phusiognōmonia, from phusis nature + gnōmōn judge]
physiognomic, ˌphysiogˈnomical adj
ˌphysiogˈnomically adv
ˌphysiˈognomist n

phys•i•og•no•my

(ˌfɪz iˈɒg nə mi, -ˈɒn ə mi)

n., pl. -mies.
1. the face or countenance, esp. when considered as an index to the character.
2. the art of determining character or personal characteristics from the form or features of the body, esp. of the face.
[1350–1400; Middle English fis(e)namie, fisnomie < Middle French fisonomie < Medieval Latin phys(i)onomia < Late Greek physiognōmía, Greek physiognōmonía art of judging people by their features; see physio-, gnomon, -y3]
phys`i•og•nom′ic (-ɒgˈnɒm ɪk, əˈnɒm-) phys`i•og•nom′i•cal, adj.
phys`i•og•nom′i•cal•ly, adv.

physiognomy, physiognomics

1. the art of determining character or personal qualities from the features or form of the body, especially the face.
2. divination by examining the features of a face. — physiognomist, n. — physiognomic, physiognomical, adj.
See also: Facial Features

physiognomy

Character analysis using facial features.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.physiognomy - the human face (`kisser' and `smiler' and `mug' are informal terms for `face' and `phiz' is British)physiognomy - the human face (`kisser' and `smiler' and `mug' are informal terms for `face' and `phiz' is British)
human head - the head of a human being
face, human face - the front of the human head from the forehead to the chin and ear to ear; "he washed his face"; "I wish I had seen the look on his face when he got the news"
pudding face, pudding-face - a large fat human face
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom

physiognomy

noun face, features, look, clock (Brit. slang), dial (Brit. slang), countenance, visage, phiz (slang), phizog (slang) his thick black hair and bony Irish physiognomy

physiognomy

noun
An outward appearance:
Translations

physiognomy

[ˌfɪzɪˈɒnəmɪ] Nfisonomía f

physiognomy

n (= face)Physiognomie f; (= study)Physiognomik f; (fig)äußere Erscheinung, Aussehen nt; the physiognomy of the Labour Partydas Gesicht der Labour Party

physiognomy

[ˌfɪzɪˈɒnəmɪ] n (person's features) (Geog) → fisionomia; (art of judging character) → fisiognomia

phys·i·og·no·my

n. fisionomía, semblante, rasgos faciales.
References in classic literature ?
The study of the young king, which had begun a long time before, without anybody suspecting it, was continued then, and he looked around him attentively to endeavor to make out something in the physiognomies which had at first appeared the most insignificant and trivial.
But Colbert, approaching him, offered to his eyes a physiognomy so different from that which he had been accustomed to see him wear; he appeared so good, so mild, so easy; his eyes took the expression of an intelligence so noble, that D'Artagnan, a connoisseur in physiognomies, was moved, and almost changed in his convictions.
Under these average boyish physiognomies that she seems to turn off by the gross, she conceals some of her most rigid, inflexible purposes, some of her most unmodifiable characters; and the dark-eyed, demonstrative, rebellious girl may after all turn out to be a passive being compared with this pink-and-white bit of masculinity with the indeterminate features.
The Belgian pair's first US exhibition presents a new video, a work composed for organ (to be performed in a local cathedral), and steel sculptures elaborating on their earlier White Elements, 2012-, masklike white physiognomies (and functioning fountains) that could be public sculpture in Thys and de Gruyter's world.
The uncanny portraits recall della Porta's physiognomies, except that Lee collapses the "interface" by fusing animal and human features.
Analysing photographs of asylum inmates, we learn how body language and clothing were presented to denote states of mind and how patients were motivated into recovery by judging and improving on their own physiognomies.
Applications such as the one developed by CVC-UAB researchers require extreme precision in the identification phase and are very difficult to configure given that the surroundings in which they will be used include changes in light and shadow, different physiognomies and speeds at which the signs are formed.