piazza


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pi·az·za

 (pē-ăz′ə, -ä′zə)
n.
1. A public square, especially in an Italian town.
2. A roofed and arcaded passageway; a colonnade.
3. New England & Southern Atlantic US A veranda.

[Italian, from Latin platēa, street, from Greek plateia (hodos), broad (way), feminine of platus, broad; see plat- in Indo-European roots.]

piazza

(pɪˈætsə; -ˈædzə; Italian ˈpjattsa)
n
1. (Civil Engineering) a large open square in an Italian town
2. (Architecture) chiefly Brit a covered passageway or gallery
[C16: from Italian: marketplace, from Latin platēa courtyard, from Greek plateia; see place]

pi•az•za

(piˈæz ə, -ˈɑ zə or, for 1,3, piˈæt sə, -ˈɑt-)

n., pl. pi•az•zas, It. piaz•ze (ˈpyɑt tsɛ)
1. an open public square in a city or town, esp. in Italy.
2. Chiefly New Eng. and Southern U.S. a large porch; veranda.
[1575–85; < Italian < Latin platēa courtyard < Greek plateîa]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.piazza - a public square with room for pedestrianspiazza - a public square with room for pedestrians; "they met at Elm Plaza"; "Grosvenor Place"
public square, square - an open area at the meeting of two or more streets
Translations

piazza

[pɪˈætsə] N (US) → pórtico m, galería f; (= square) → plaza f

piazza

[piˈætsə] npiazza f

piazza

nPiazza f, → (Markt)platz m; (US: = veranda) → (überdachte) Veranda
References in classic literature ?
Can you tell us where we can obtain a sight of the Piazza del Popolo?
Even Black Tilly who washes the floor, looked through the piazza window and called me 'Honey, child' when she wasn't crying too much to call me anything.
His soul palpitating with love of art, he painted the models who hung about the stairway of Bernini in the Piazza de Spagna, undaunted by their obvious picturesqueness; and his studio was full of canvases on which were portrayed moustachioed, large-eyed peasants in peaked hats, urchins in becoming rags, and women in bright petticoats.
I have been ploughing and sowing and raising and printing and praying, and now begin to come out upon a less bristling time, and to enjoy the calm prospect of things from a fair piazza at the north of the old farmhouse here.
Now, with elated step, they pace the planks in twos and threes, and humorously discourse of parlors, sofas, carpets, and fine cambrics; propose to mat the deck; think of having hangings to the top; object not to taking tea by moonlight on the piazza of the forecastle.
He could see the quaint little figure sitting on the piazza at North Riverboro and watch it disappear in the lilac bushes when he gave the memorable order for three hundred cakes of Rose-Red and Snow-White soap.
But it gave them strength to drift into another Piazza, large and dusty, on the farther side of which rose a black-and-white facade of surpassing ugliness.
It was one of those spacious farmhouses, with high- ridged but lowly sloping roofs, built in the style handed down from the first Dutch settlers; the low projecting eaves forming a piazza along the front, capable of being closed up in bad weather.
I sat in front of Florian's cafe, eating ices, listening to music, talking with acquaintances: the traveler will remember how the immense cluster of tables and little chairs stretches like a promontory into the smooth lake of the Piazza.
In the end I was obliged to be satisfied with the Piazza Barberini, after I had exerted myself in vain to find an anti-Christian quarter.
Under this pretence he took Ramiro, and one morning caused him to be executed and left on the piazza at Cesena with the block and a bloody knife at his side.
From without came the pleasant murmur of bees and many lazier insects floating over the gorgeous flower beds, resting for a while on the clematis which had made the piazza a blaze of purple splendour.