picaresque


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pic·a·resque

 (pĭk′ə-rĕsk′, pē′kə-)
adj.
1. Of or involving clever rogues or adventurers.
2. Of or relating to a genre of usually satiric prose fiction originating in Spain and depicting in realistic, often humorous detail the adventures of a roguish hero of low social degree living by his or her wits in a corrupt society.
n.
One that is picaresque.

[French, from Spanish picaresco, from pícaro, picaro; see picaro.]

picaresque

(ˌpɪkəˈrɛsk)
adj
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) of or relating to a type of fiction in which the hero, a rogue, goes through a series of episodic adventures. It originated in Spain in the 16th century
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) of or involving rogues or picaroons
[C19: via French from Spanish picaresco, from pícaro a rogue]

pic•a•resque

(ˌpɪk əˈrɛsk)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to a form of prose fiction, orig. developed in Spain, in which the adventures of a roguish hero are described in a series of usu. humorous or satiric episodes.
2. of, pertaining to, or resembling rogues.
[1800–10; < Sp picaresco]

picaresque

A genre in which a roguish hero or heroine goes through a series of adventures.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.picaresque - involving clever rogues or adventurers especially as in a type of fiction; "picaresque novels"; "waifs of the picaresque tradition"; "a picaresque hero"
dishonest, dishonorable - deceptive or fraudulent; disposed to cheat or defraud or deceive
Translations
pikarisch

picaresque

[ˌpɪkəˈresk] ADJpicaresco

picaresque

adjpikaresk; picaresque novelSchelmenroman m, → pikaresker Roman

picaresque

[ˌpɪkəˈrɛsk] adj (liter) → picaresco/a
References in classic literature ?
This was the famous picaresque novel, 'Lazarillo de Tormes,' by Hurtado de Mendoza, whose name then so familiarized itself to my fondness that now as I write it I feel as if it were that of an old personal friend whom I had known in the flesh.
I do not know that I should counsel others to do so, or that the general reader would find his account in it, but I am sure that the intending author of American fiction would do well to study the Spanish picaresque novels; for in their simplicity of design he will find one of the best forms for an American story.
He must have acquired experiences which would form abundant material for a picaresque novel of modern Paris, but he remained aloof, and judging from his conversation there was nothing in those years that had made a particular impression on him.
They belonged mostly to that class of realistic fiction which is called picaresque, from the Spanish word 'picaro,' a rogue, because it began in Spain with the 'Lazarillo de Tormes' of Diego de Mendoza, in 1553, and because its heroes are knavish serving-boys or similar characters whose unprincipled tricks and exploits formed the substance of the stories.
Subsequently, Nunez Rivera gives particular attention to the picaresque tradition, specifically Lazarillo de Tormes, as an informing literary genre to Cervantes's Gines de Pasamonte, El Rufian dichoso, Pedro de Urdemalas, and of course "Rinconete y Cortadillo" and "El Coloquio de los perros.
The author describes the role of the polit, a socially marginal character the world acts upon, and a variation on the Spanish picaro, as the quintessential protagonist in Jewish modernist literature, as well as its relationship to the picaresque and the Bildungsroman.
Este libro tiene su origen en el congreso Participating in the City: Microhistory and the Picaresque Novel, que tuvo lugar en la Universidad de Groningen en marzo de 2012.
The Picaresque Novel in Western Literature: From the Sixteenth Century to the Neopicaresque.
From that point on, the reader follows Marrone down a picaresque rabbit hole as he makes himself a feigned labor leader, explores the dilapidated shacks of lower-class Buenos Aires, and comes to identify Evita herself as the shining light that will lead his quest to its hopefully triumphant conclusion.
This fifth feature helmed by China's foremost director-actor, Jiang Wen, is a saucy picaresque that salutes the world of grifters, raconteurs and dreamers, powered by a tragicomic hero negotiating his way around warlords, prostitutes, police chiefs and aspiring filmmakers.
Though La vida del Lazarillo de Tormes, y de sus fortunas y adversidades (1554) has long been acknowledged the seminal text of the picaresque genre, a gap has opened between historical and theoretical accounts of its role in literary history.
Van Praag, which only adds depth and interest to this riveting picaresque narration.