picaresque

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picaresque

a style of fiction dealing with the episodic adventures of rogues; pertaining to or resembling rogues
Not to be confused with:
picturesque – beautiful or striking as in a picture: a picturesque scene; strikingly graphic; vivid: picturesque speech

pic·a·resque

 (pĭk′ə-rĕsk′, pē′kə-)
adj.
1. Of or involving clever rogues or adventurers.
2. Of or relating to a genre of usually satiric prose fiction originating in Spain and depicting in realistic, often humorous detail the adventures of a roguish hero of low social degree living by his or her wits in a corrupt society.
n.
One that is picaresque.

[French, from Spanish picaresco, from pícaro, picaro; see picaro.]

picaresque

(ˌpɪkəˈrɛsk)
adj
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) of or relating to a type of fiction in which the hero, a rogue, goes through a series of episodic adventures. It originated in Spain in the 16th century
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) of or involving rogues or picaroons
[C19: via French from Spanish picaresco, from pícaro a rogue]

pic•a•resque

(ˌpɪk əˈrɛsk)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to a form of prose fiction, orig. developed in Spain, in which the adventures of a roguish hero are described in a series of usu. humorous or satiric episodes.
2. of, pertaining to, or resembling rogues.
[1800–10; < Sp picaresco]

picaresque

A genre in which a roguish hero or heroine goes through a series of adventures.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.picaresque - involving clever rogues or adventurers especially as in a type of fiction; "picaresque novels"; "waifs of the picaresque tradition"; "a picaresque hero"
dishonest, dishonorable - deceptive or fraudulent; disposed to cheat or defraud or deceive
Translations
pikarisch

picaresque

[ˌpɪkəˈresk] ADJpicaresco

picaresque

adjpikaresk; picaresque novelSchelmenroman m, → pikaresker Roman

picaresque

[ˌpɪkəˈrɛsk] adj (liter) → picaresco/a
References in periodicals archive ?
"In language as lovely as the horticultural marvels she so picaresquely describes, Gilbert's The Signature of All Things will take root in the imagination of its readers.
It dawdles picaresquely around the manifold stations and halts of the min1d, here pausing to allow unpromising ideas to alight, there taking on the coal of coherent invention, but everywhere prone to immediate and catastrophic derailment.