pictorialist


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pictorialist

(pɪkˈtɔːrɪəlɪst)
n
(Photography) photog a follower or believer in the pictorialism movement
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, the country's contribution to the international pictorialist photography movement, which aimed to fashion the medium into a fine art around 1900, may have boasted the brooding character of Wagnerian opera or German fin-de-siecle literature and painting, connections covered well in Fotogeschichte issue no.
Among those who subscribed to Rodin's greatness was the American photographer Edward Steichen, who utilized the full battery of Pictorialist tonal manipulation to evoke the sculptor's cult status and his mystifying creativity.
"Edward Weston: The Early Years" has as its particular focus his early years in the field which coincided exactly with the height of the Pictorialist movement in America, and while he was never a typical practitioner, he did make photographs that borrowed themes from paintings and other media, and experimented with soft-focused imagery that sometimes looks more like graphite drawings or inky dark prints than photographs.
Aubrey Bodine (1906--1970) was a newspaper photographer, pictorialist, modernist, and documentarian, as well as the Baltimore Sun feature photographer from 1924-1970.
Within a few years, the New Stagecraft successfully banished Belasco-style "euphemistic realism" utilizing heavily pictorialist scenography to the scrapheap of history (Chansky 2004, 4).
(19.) Stephan Meier-Oeser distinguishes between pictorialist and propositionalist theories of mental language.
Her early art photographs were Pictorialist in style, characterized by soft focus and allegorical themes.
Yellow Dot--the pictorialist (need the WHEN, detailed and punctual who need clear information, cautious, quiet, logical, you'll hear them say "I SEE")
Shawn Michelle Smith's chapter on the works of Barthes and early twentieth-century Pictorialist F.
Accompanied by an extensive catalogue, this exhibition of some 250 photographs and three films spans Strand's career, from his Pictorialist origins and brilliant experiments of the 1910s and '2Us through the extended portraits of places--from Mexico to Ghana--that occupied him from the '30s through the '60s.
In her study of Parnassian poetry in France and Russia, Maria Rubins explains that no other group of European poets produced more pictorialist and ekphrastic poetry, and Machado was well aware of this.
Influenced by the Pictorialist arts movement, Curtis's photos were characterized by soft-focus, shadowed lighting and sentimental staging to evince highly evocative and romanticized images.