picturephone


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picturephone

(ˈpɪktʃəˌfəʊn)
n
(Communications & Information) telephony a type of telephone where users can see each other as they talk, through the transmission of video images
References in periodicals archive ?
That's where Bell Labs unveiled its Picturephone, a futuristic service that transmitted a 30-frames-per-second, black-and-white image on a screen about five inches square.
On June 24, 1964, AT&T inaugurated commercial ''Picturephone'' service between New York, Chicago and Washington, D.C., as Lady Bird Johnson, wife of the president, called Dr.
As an example, AT&T commercialized the Picturephone [3], but the sales were really low.
Tely Labs, a maker of videoconferencing system has partnered with global visual communications distributor PicturePhone Inc, to supply its advanced videoconferencing products and accessories to the channel.
Although managed by one of the most brilliant members of the Labs, John Pierce, the satellite communication program was doomed when the federal government decided to create COMSAT in 1962, excluding AT&T The Picturephone seemed to be the future of business and ultimately residential service, after Bell Labs' success in reducing the costs of what were originally elite services, but the service never reached a critical mass of users.
Other gadgets and inventions--such as the picturephone and household robots--may well become successes of the future.
That meant videophones, primarily the AT&T Picturephone, required a lot of bandwidth and bit transmission relative to the networks available.
TELECOMWORLDWIRE-18 June 2007-TelePresence Tech and PicturePhone Direct sign distribution agreement(C)1994-2007 M2 COMMUNICATIONS LTD http://www.m2.com
He backs up his theory with breezy accounts of such fiascos as the 1956 Picturephone, Interactive TV, Iridium and Globalstar, tablet PCs, DEC's Alpha chip, ISDN, and electronic exchanges.
Televisual classrooms and the installation of the "picturephone" (JR 377), fantastic and even prophetic as they are appearing in a 1971 novel, do not compare with the zanier projects of Vogel, the mad scientist of JR.
In the 1950s, Bell unveiled the first "PicturePhone" and, a decade later, demonstrated consumer versions of the device at the New York World's Fair.
All-purpose personal communicator systems geared to societies "on the go" involve multifunctions: cell phone, e-mall capability, PC, Web surfer, fax, video-television, picturephone, AM-FM radio, global positioning system, etc.