piddock

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pid·dock

 (pĭd′ək)
n.
Any of several marine bivalve mollusks of the family Pholadidae, having a long rasping shell used to bore into wood, rock, and clay, and often damaging jetties and wharves.

[Origin unknown.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

piddock

(ˈpɪdək)
n
(Animals) any marine bivalve of the family Pholadidae, boring into rock, clay, or wood by means of sawlike shell valves. See also shipworm
[C19: origin uncertain]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pid•dock

(ˈpɪd ək)

n.
any bivalve mollusk of the family Pholadidae, able to burrow in soft rock, wood, etc.
[1850–55; of obscure orig.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.piddock - marine bivalve that bores into rock or clay or wood by means of saw-like shellspiddock - marine bivalve that bores into rock or clay or wood by means of saw-like shells
bivalve, lamellibranch, pelecypod - marine or freshwater mollusks having a soft body with platelike gills enclosed within two shells hinged together
genus Pholas, Pholas - type genus of the family Pholadidae: piddocks
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Over the next few years he purchased more land, especially from Piddocks Farm, and by 1828 owned 59 acres.
They form a home for burrowing clams called piddocks, as well as crabs, mussels, periwinkles and worms.
The requirement also applies to the harvest of other saltwater shellfish - including mussels, abalone, oysters, piddocks, shrimp or scallops - but not to crayfish or freshwater clams.