resection

(redirected from piecemeal resection)
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re·sec·tion

 (rĭ-sĕk′shən)
n.
Surgical removal of all or part of an organ, tissue, or structure.

resection

(rɪˈsɛkʃən)
n
1. (Surgery) surgery excision of part of a bone, organ, or other part
2. (Surveying) surveying a method of fixing the position of a point by making angular observations to three fixed points
reˈsectional adj

re•sec•tion

(rɪˈsɛk ʃən)

n.
1. Survey. a technique of ascertaining the location of a point by taking bearings from the point on two other points of known location.
2. Surg. the excision of all or part of an organ or tissue.
[1605–15; < Latin resectiō cutting back <resecāre (see resect)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.resection - surgical removal of part of a structure or organ
surgical operation, surgical procedure, surgical process, surgery, operation - a medical procedure involving an incision with instruments; performed to repair damage or arrest disease in a living body; "they will schedule the operation as soon as an operating room is available"; "he died while undergoing surgery"
transurethral resection of the prostate, TURP - removal of significant amounts of prostate tissue (as in cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia)
Translations

resection

[riːˈsekʃən] N
1. (Survey) → triangulación f
2. (Med) → resección f

resection

n
(Med) → Resektion f
(Surv) → Triangulation f

re·sec·tion

n. resección, extirpación de una porción de órgano o tejido;
bloc ______ en bloque;
gastric ______ gástrica;
transurethral ______ transuretral;
wedge ______ en cuña.

resection

n resección f; transurethral — of the prostate (TURP) resección transuretral de próstata (RTU)
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparison of en-bloc or piecemeal resection and lesion size to the recurrence rates between the groups revealed that the control group had higher recurrence rates when lesions were resected piecemeal compared with that for en-bloc resection (24.2% vs.
EMR involves the expansion of submucosal space to create a plane for safe en bloc or piecemeal resection of colorectal polyps without injuring muscle [9], while ESD involves a larger en bloc resection which often includes submucosal tissue [10].
Twenty-two patients had undetermined resection margins due to piecemeal resection, fourteen patients had nonradical polypectomy resection margins, and two patients had Haggitt level 3.
For patients who fail standard approaches, treatment alternatives are limited to "salvage" re-resection with curative intent in a very small percentage of patients who present with isolated lesions, long disease-free interval, good performance status, and acceptable morbidity; for those with multifocal recurrences, a history of piecemeal resection, tumor rupture, or prior treatment with high-dose RT, curative-intent therapies are definitely not recommended based on most recent guidelines from the Chordoma Global Consensus Group [18].
To effect a complete resection, optimization of exposure to define the circumferential tumor margins is critical before proceeding with a piecemeal resection. (4,5)
Piecemeal resection makes it difficult to assess tumor extension from the resected tumor piece, and therefore, en bloc resection is mandatory for a successful oncologic outcome.
The nasal part of the tumor was debulked by segmental and piecemeal resection to increase access and surgical maneuverability in mobilizing the distal part of the tumor.
Since there was no distinct plane of dissection around the mass, a piecemeal resection was performed, resulting in near gross total removal.
Previous studies reported that the upper area of the stomach, piecemeal resection, and long procedure times were risk factors associated with perforation after ESD [13-16, 20].
Clinical outcomes of colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection and risk factors associated with piecemeal resection