piecer

piecer

(ˈpiːsə)
n
(Textiles) textiles a person who mends, repairs, or joins something, esp broken threads on a loom
References in periodicals archive ?
He had been educated at Newsome Church of England School and worked as a piecer at E H Sellars and Sons Ltd at Scar Mills.
Walter Mills was 23 years of age and worked as a piecer at Messrs.
since that was home, he probably figured I might show something eventually." I imagined feathering passes to different Bear Cats as my dad's hands caressed that "one piecer," bringing out all the memories hidden inside its fine, close grain.
South African winger Piecer Rossouw went over for the visitors four minutes later as the Irish camped on the Quins line.
On the other hand, on mentioning Concave of the Elf Skate Crew, you might be told that skateboarder graffiti is different; yet Concave's tags are stylish and he is a capable piecer. Gang members, too, incorporate tagging graffiti into their experience in a number of ways.
This is the normal format for the five piecer and clearly one in which they are most comfortable.
Albert's first job, at 12, was as a piecer at a textile mill in Failsworth, after he moved to the Manchester area with his mother.
He had worked as a woollen piecer at Jas Sykes and Son in Milnsbridge.
spanned the generations, from the teenage cotton piecer Samuel Sigley to
Smaller mules were generally worked by family members who received a family wage, but the new piecer and scavanger positions required on the longer mules were not filled by family members.(50) Thus, to raise their own earnings, after 1820 spinners had an incentive to cut the wages of their assistants who were not related and to work them harder.