pietistic


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pi·e·tism

 (pī′ĭ-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. Stress on the emotional and personal aspects of religion.
2. Affected or exaggerated piety.
3. Pietism A reform movement in the German Lutheran Church during the 1600s and 1700s, which strove to renew the devotional ideal in the Protestant religion.

[German Pietismus, from Latin pietās, piety; see piety.]

pi′e·tist n.
pi′e·tis′tic adj.
pi′e·tis′ti·cal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.pietistic - of or relating to Pietism; "the Pietistic movement"
2.pietistic - excessively or hypocritically pious; "a sickening sanctimonious smile"
pious - having or showing or expressing reverence for a deity; "pious readings"

pietistic

adjective
Deeply concerned with God and the beliefs and practice of religion:
Translations

pietistic

[paɪəˈtɪstɪk] ADJ (pej) → pietista, beato, mojigato

pietistic

adj (pej)frömmelnd
References in periodicals archive ?
It was Spener, over a century and a half after the Reformation who designated the laity as a "spiritual priesthood." It is this Pietistic distinction which reinforces a division--even opposition--between clergy and laity, which is wholly unwarranted in early Lutheranism.
Among his topics are structure and themes, continuity and innovation, suppressed voices, between publication and concealment, Halakhah versus Kabbalah, Tiferent Bahurim as a pietistic work dealing with death, the preaching section, and a testament to the children.
Charles Lloyd Cohen has shown us a puritan conversionary sensibility enriched by love and joy and other gifts of the Spirit, revealing a grace that could both stimulate pietistic effort and dispense an "easing" of the consciousness of sin.
This insight allows analysis of both "a learned culture which was committed to breaking the senses apart and bringing order to them" and a set of pietistic auditory sensibilities and practices, commonly dismissed since 1700, as products of superstition, gullibility, hallucination, or even mental illness (ix).
But he tends to overlook other forms of devotional piety in which the emotional remains important: the rich tradition of Protestant hymnody, the use by Jesuits and Capuchins of a highly evocative preaching style, and the emergence in the 17th century of a highly emotional pietistic literature.
Gibson's pluralistic view of seventeenth-century Dutch viewers fruitfully counters any simple distinctions between pietistic or humanist viewers (60-61).
Their "rational surroundings" were absorbed to the point that pietistic revival movements, e.g., Hasidim, never had a chance.
The pietistic censors at Qumram, however, proscribed the book of Esther, anticipating through their doctrinal rigidity, an inflexible approach to matters canonical.
Still, he feels so passionately the need to defend Indian traditions that he seeks refuge for his poetic in a pietistic Hindu Advaitist idealism.
Because the Christianness of the last century was basically pietistic and individual, it could form part of institutionalized Christianity without any great tension.
Developed, I believe, with a North American audience in mind, the series corrects the often individualistic and pietistic picture we have drawn of Jesus, and presents Jesus as the fulfilment of the whole of Israel's story.
Beginning with the women-dominated household in which Nietzsche was brought up, Diethe provides a sympathetic portrait of his mother, Franziska Oehler, as a person in her own right, who was married at seventeen, widowed six years later, and understandably sought solace in pietistic devotion.