pinchpenny

pinch·pen·ny

 (pĭnch′pĕn′ē)
adj.
1. Unwilling to give or spend money; penny-pinching.
2. Characterized by scarcity of money: a pinchpenny economy.
n. pl. pinch·pen·nies
A penny pincher.

pinchpenny

(ˈpɪntʃˌpɛnɪ)
adj
niggardly; miserly
n, pl -nies
a miserly person; niggard

pinch•pen•ny

(ˈpɪntʃˌpɛn i)

n., pl. -nies,
adj. n.
1. a miser or niggard; penny pincher.
adj.
2. stingy; miserly.
[1375–1425]
Translations

pinchpenny

(o.f.) [ˈpɪntʃpenɪ] ADJtacaño

pinchpenny

adjknauserig, pfennigfuchserisch
References in periodicals archive ?
Pinchpenny diplomacy: The decline of "good international citizenship" in Canadian foreign policy.
1,600 gal chlorine tank filled twice weekly, route and repairs, Best prices beats Leslie Pools, PinchPenny & Home Depot
Reeder to enforce some good library practices on some less considerate library patrons, including the stingy Mayor Pinchpenny.
Pinchpenny Press, Goshen College, Goshen, IN 46526.
Which means Shelley must now stand firm, no matter how vocal the protests from pinchpenny local officials.
been a small man, or a pinchpenny, or a man of little courage or foresight, The Register-Guard would be just another newspaper today,' wrote Bend Bulletin Editor and Publisher Bob Chandler.
Off the field, "Revoltin' Joe" (as one wag dubbed him) was a greedy, self-serving pinchpenny.
Obviously restricted by a pinchpenny budget, Davis works hard to make a virtue of necessity by using still photos and silent film title cards to evoke period flavor.
It's only coincidence that on June 7, ten years and a day after Californians overwhelmingly approved Proposition 13, which set a ceiling on state and local tax rates, they'll vote on California's first measure to ease the crippling pinchpenny restrictions they placed on their public services.