pine vole


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

pine vole

n.
A small vole (Microtus pinetorum) of forested regions of eastern North America. Also called pine mouse, woodland vole.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pine vole - short-tailed glossy-furred burrowing vole of the eastern United States
field mouse, vole - any of various small mouselike rodents of the family Cricetidae (especially of genus Microtus) having a stout short-tailed body and inconspicuous ears and inhabiting fields or meadows
genus Pitymys, Pitymys - pine mice
References in periodicals archive ?
Common species in North America are the meadow vole, pine vole, and mountain vole.
The pine vole looks like a mouse, lives underground close to the surface where they feed on bulbs, tubers, seeds, vegetable garden plants and the bark (roots included) of all woody plants.
Water metabolism in the Pine Vole Pitymys pinetorum.
Social organization and population control in the pine vole, Microtus pinetorum.
Where pine vole infestation is heavy, the ground will have an almost "spongy" feel.
There's also the New Zealand Storm Petrel and the Long-Legged Warbler (both found in 2003), the Fabulous Green Sphinx Moth from Hawaii (1997), the Lord Howe Island Stick Insect (2001), and the Bavarian Pine Vole (2000).
The rediscovery of the Lord Howe Island stick insect and Bavarian pine vole was a nice surprise," said Hilton-Taylor.
Since that publication, Hilton-Taylor says, rediscoveries have justified reclassifying two of the extinct species: a plant that's a close relative of the national flower of Mauritius and the Bavarian pine vole.
Helping in pine voles Microtus pinetorum: growth and survival of younger siblings, and the evolution of pine vole sociality.
The pine vole (Pitymys pinetorum) is a species of the eastern United States with spotty occurrence in northeastern (Bowie, Marion, Nacogdoches, Wood counties--Davis 1974:224; Panola County--Parmalee, 1954) and central Texas (Gillespie, Kerr counties--Davis, 1974:224; Hill County--Cleveland et al.
One is the meadow vole, which feeds mostly at the ground surface, and the second is the pine vole, which feeds underground.
Our objective was to identify changes in microhabitat variables following silviculture and to link these changes to micro-site selection by four mammal species occupying eastern forests of the United States; eastern chipmunk, white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus), short-tailed shrew, and pine vole (Microtus pinetorum).