pinion

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pinion

the outer part of a bird’s wing; a small toothed gear engaging with a larger one
Not to be confused with:
piñon – a pine bearing edible seeds; a type of pine nut

pin·ion 1

(pĭn′yən)
n.
1. The wing of a bird.
2. The outer rear edge of the wing of a bird, containing the primary flight feathers.
3. A primary flight feather of a bird.
tr.v. pin·ioned, pin·ion·ing, pin·ions
1.
a. To remove or bind the wing feathers of (a bird) to prevent flight.
b. To cut or bind (the wings of a bird).
2.
a. To restrain or immobilize (a person) by binding the arms.
b. To bind (a person's arms).
3. To bind fast or hold down; shackle.

[Middle English, from Old French pignon, from Vulgar Latin *pinniō, pinniōn-, from Latin penna, pinna, feather; see pinna.]

pin·ion 2

 (pĭn′yən)
n.
A small cogwheel that engages or is engaged by a larger cogwheel or a rack.

[French pignon, from Old French peignon, probably from peigne, comb, from Latin pecten, from pectere, to comb.]

pinion

(ˈpɪnjən)
n
1. (Poetry) chiefly poetic a bird's wing
2. (Zoology) the part of a bird's wing including the flight feathers
vb (tr)
3. to hold or bind (the arms) of (a person) so as to restrain or immobilize him
4. to confine or shackle
5. (Falconry) to make (a bird) incapable of flight by removing that part of (the wing) from which the flight feathers grow
[C15: from Old French pignon wing, from Latin pinna wing]

pinion

(ˈpɪnjən)
n
(General Engineering) a cogwheel that engages with a larger wheel or rack, which it drives or by which it is driven
[C17: from French pignon cogwheel, from Old French peigne comb, from Latin pecten comb; see pecten]

pin•ion1

(ˈpɪn yən)

n.
1. a gear with a small number of teeth, esp. one engaging a rack or larger gear.
2. a shaft or spindle cut with teeth engaging a gear.
[1650–60; < French pignon cogwheel, Middle French peignon, derivative of peigne comb < Latin pecten]

pin•ion2

(ˈpɪn yən)

n.
1. the distal or terminal segment of the wing of a bird consisting of the carpus, metacarpus, and phalanges.
2. the wing of a bird.
3. a feather.
v.t.
4. to cut off the pinion of (a wing) or bind (the wings), as in order to prevent a bird from flying.
5. to bind (a person's arms or hands) so they cannot be used.
6. to disable (someone) in such a manner; shackle.
7. to bind or hold fast, as to a thing.
[1400–50; late Middle English pynyon < Middle French pignon wing, pinion < Vulgar Latin *pinniōnem, acc. of *pinniō, derivative of Latin pinna feather, wing, fin]
rack, pinion - Rack is the linear gear and pinion is the circular gear in a mechanism.
See also related terms for mechanism.

pinion


Past participle: pinioned
Gerund: pinioning

Imperative
pinion
pinion
Present
I pinion
you pinion
he/she/it pinions
we pinion
you pinion
they pinion
Preterite
I pinioned
you pinioned
he/she/it pinioned
we pinioned
you pinioned
they pinioned
Present Continuous
I am pinioning
you are pinioning
he/she/it is pinioning
we are pinioning
you are pinioning
they are pinioning
Present Perfect
I have pinioned
you have pinioned
he/she/it has pinioned
we have pinioned
you have pinioned
they have pinioned
Past Continuous
I was pinioning
you were pinioning
he/she/it was pinioning
we were pinioning
you were pinioning
they were pinioning
Past Perfect
I had pinioned
you had pinioned
he/she/it had pinioned
we had pinioned
you had pinioned
they had pinioned
Future
I will pinion
you will pinion
he/she/it will pinion
we will pinion
you will pinion
they will pinion
Future Perfect
I will have pinioned
you will have pinioned
he/she/it will have pinioned
we will have pinioned
you will have pinioned
they will have pinioned
Future Continuous
I will be pinioning
you will be pinioning
he/she/it will be pinioning
we will be pinioning
you will be pinioning
they will be pinioning
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been pinioning
you have been pinioning
he/she/it has been pinioning
we have been pinioning
you have been pinioning
they have been pinioning
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been pinioning
you will have been pinioning
he/she/it will have been pinioning
we will have been pinioning
you will have been pinioning
they will have been pinioning
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been pinioning
you had been pinioning
he/she/it had been pinioning
we had been pinioning
you had been pinioning
they had been pinioning
Conditional
I would pinion
you would pinion
he/she/it would pinion
we would pinion
you would pinion
they would pinion
Past Conditional
I would have pinioned
you would have pinioned
he/she/it would have pinioned
we would have pinioned
you would have pinioned
they would have pinioned
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pinion - a gear with a small number of teeth designed to mesh with a larger wheel or rackpinion - a gear with a small number of teeth designed to mesh with a larger wheel or rack
cogwheel, gear, gear wheel, geared wheel - a toothed wheel that engages another toothed mechanism in order to change the speed or direction of transmitted motion
lantern pinion, lantern wheel - a small pinion having cylindrical bars instead of teeth, used chiefly in inexpensive clocks
2.pinion - any of the larger wing or tail feathers of a birdpinion - any of the larger wing or tail feathers of a bird
feather, plumage, plume - the light horny waterproof structure forming the external covering of birds
wing - a movable organ for flying (one of a pair)
primary feather, primary quill, primary - one of the main flight feathers projecting along the outer edge of a bird's wing
tail feather - feather growing from the tail (uropygium) of a bird
3.pinion - wing of a bird
bird - warm-blooded egg-laying vertebrates characterized by feathers and forelimbs modified as wings
wing - a movable organ for flying (one of a pair)
Verb1.pinion - bind the arms of
restrain, confine, hold - to close within bounds, limit or hold back from movement; "This holds the local until the express passengers change trains"; "About a dozen animals were held inside the stockade"; "The illegal immigrants were held at a detention center"; "The terrorists held the journalists for ransom"
2.pinion - cut the wings off (of birds)
disable, disenable, incapacitate - make unable to perform a certain action; "disable this command on your computer"

pinion

verb immobilize, tie, bind, chain, confine, fasten, shackle, pin down, fetter, manacle His arms were pinioned against his sides.
Translations

pinion

1 [ˈpɪnjən]
A. N (poet) → ala f
B. VT [+ bird] → cortar las alas a; [+ person] → atar los brazos a
he was pinioned against the walllo tenían inmovilizado contra la pared

pinion

2 [ˈpɪnjən] N (Mech) → piñón m

pinion

[ˈpɪnjən] vt [+ person] → immobiliser
to pinion sb's arms → agripper les bras de qn

pinion

n
(Mech) → Ritzel nt, → Treibrad nt
(poet, = wing) → Fittich m (poet), → Schwinge f (poet)
(Orn) → Flügelspitze f
vt to pinion somebody to the ground/against the walljdn zu Boden/gegen eine Wand drücken

pinion

[ˈpɪnjən] n (Tech) → pignone m
References in classic literature ?
Macey, who felt very well satisfied with this attack on youthful presumption; "you're right there, Tookey: there's allays two 'pinions; there's the 'pinion a man has of himsen, and there's the 'pinion other folks have on him.
From the future come winds with stealthy pinions, and to fine ears good tidings are proclaimed.
Her physical eye saw the cake she was stirring and the loaf she was kneading; her physical ear heard the kitchen fire crackling and the teakettle singing, but ever and anon her fancy mounted on pinions, rested itself, renewed its strength in the upper air.
Akut had just time to leap to one side to avoid being pinioned beneath these battling monsters of the jungle.
Never seraph spread a pinion Over fabric half so fair.
And whereas they have, all their times, sacrificed to themselves, they become in the end, themselves sacrifices to the inconstancy of fortune, whose wings they thought, by their self-wisdom, to have pinioned.
The other prisoners had better usage; two of them were kept pinioned, indeed, because the captain was not able to trust them; but the other two were taken into my service, upon the captain's recommendation, and upon their solemnly engaging to live and die with us; so with them and the three honest men we were seven men, well armed; and I made no doubt we should be able to deal well enough with the ten that were coming, considering that the captain had said there were three or four honest men among them also.
The thing, which more nearly resembled our earthly men than it did the Martians I had seen, held me pinioned to the ground with one huge foot, while it jabbered and gesticulated at some answering creature behind me.
Say he were pinioned even; knotted all over with ropes and hawsers; chained down to ring-bolts on this cabin floor; he would be more hideous than a caged tiger, then.
We were boarded about the same time by both the pirates, who entered furiously at the head of their men; but finding us all prostrate upon our faces (for so I gave order), they pinioned us with strong ropes, and setting guard upon us, went to search the sloop.
D'Arnot gave a warning shout to his column as the blacks closed on him, but before he could draw his revolver he had been pinioned and dragged into the jungle.
His arms were pinioned to his sides and there was horror and terror on his face, that looked imploringly at the youths from above the topmost coil of those encircling him.