piquet


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Related to piquet: picquet

pi·quet

also pic·quet  (pĭ-kā′)
n.
A trick-taking card game for two people, played with a deck from which all cards below the seven, aces being high, are omitted.

[French.]

piquet

(pɪˈkɛt; -ˈkeɪ)
n
(Card Games) a card game for two people playing with a reduced pack and scoring points for card combinations and tricks won
[C17: from French, of unknown origin; compare pique2]

pi•quet

(pɪˈkeɪ, -ˈkɛt)

n.
a card game played by two persons with a pack of 32 cards, the cards from deuces to sixes being excluded.
[1640–50; < French; see pique, -et]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.piquet - a card game for two players using a reduced pack of 32 cards
card game, cards - a game played with playing cards
2.piquet - a form of military punishment used by the British in the late 17th century in which a soldier was forced to stand on one foot on a pointed stake
torturing, torture - the deliberate, systematic, or wanton infliction of physical or mental suffering by one or more persons in an attempt to force another person to yield information or to make a confession or for any other reason; "it required unnatural torturing to extract a confession"
Translations

piquet

[pɪˈket] Npiquet m
References in classic literature ?
During the evening we played innumerable games of piquet, and bravely, not to disappoint my efforts, he tried to appear interested.
In the evening the rector of a neighboring parish drove over to dinner, and engaged his host at the noble but obsolete game of Piquet.
The two partners at Piquet agreed to meet for a final game, on the next night, at the rector's house.
At that moment his home life, jokes with Petya, talks with Sonya, duets with Natasha, piquet with his father, and even his comfortable bed in the house on the Povarskaya rose before him with such vividness, clearness, and charm that it seemed as if it were all a lost and unappreciated bliss, long past.
The gamester, who loses his party at piquet by a single point, laments his bad luck ten times as much as he who never came within a prospect of the game.
She loves piquet, you know; but when she is gone home, I am afraid you will be sitting up by yourself, instead of going to bed at your usual timeand the idea of that would entirely destroy my comfort.
My wisest course would be to go home, and keep my good mother company over her favorite game of piquet.
Gad, I'll write him a note, and have him; and I'll try if he can play piquet as well as billiards.
Rawdon Crawley received George Osborne with great frankness and graciousness: praised his play at billiards: asked him when he would have his revenge: was interested about Osborne's regiment: and would have proposed piquet to him that very evening, but Miss Crawley absolutely forbade any gambling in her house; so that the young Lieutenant's purse was not lightened by his gallant patron, for that day at least.
Jennings interposed most acceptably; for to send the Colonel away while his love was in so much uneasiness on her sister's account, would be to deprive them both, she thought, of every comfort; and therefore telling him at once that his stay at Cleveland was necessary to herself, that she should want him to play at piquet of an evening, while Miss Dashwood was above with her sister, &c.
Many persons envied the quiet existence of this old bachelor, spent on whist, boston, backgammon, reversi, and piquet, all well played, on dinners well digested, snuff gracefully inhaled, and tranquil walks about the town.
Mary Anne's cousin deserted into our coal-hole, and was brought out, to our great amazement, by a piquet of his companions in arms, who took him away handcuffed in a procession that covered our front-garden with ignominy.