pitfall

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Related to pitfalls: reassess, prioritise

pit·fall

 (pĭt′fôl′)
n.
1. An unapparent source of trouble or danger; a hidden hazard: "potential pitfalls stemming from their optimistic inflation assumptions" (New York Times).
2. A concealed hole in the ground that serves as a trap.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pitfall

(ˈpɪtˌfɔːl)
n
1. an unsuspected difficulty or danger
2. (Hunting) a trap in the form of a concealed pit, designed to catch men or wild animals
[Old English pytt pit1 + fealle trap]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pit•fall

(ˈpɪtˌfɔl)

n.
1. a lightly covered and unnoticeable pit prepared as a trap for people or animals.
2. any trap or danger for the unwary.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pitfall - an unforeseen or unexpected or surprising difficulty
difficulty - a factor causing trouble in achieving a positive result or tending to produce a negative result; "serious difficulties were encountered in obtaining a pure reagent"
2.pitfall - a trap in the form of a concealed hole
trap - a device in which something (usually an animal) can be caught and penned
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

pitfall

noun (usually plural) danger, difficulty, peril, catch, trap, hazard, drawback, snag, uphill (S. African), banana skin (informal) The pitfalls of working abroad are numerous.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

pitfall

noun
A source of danger or difficulty not easily foreseen and avoided:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مَزْلَق، خَطَر كامِن
léčka
faldgrubefælde
csapdakelepceverem
gryfja, dulinn hætta
beklenmedik tehliketuzak

pitfall

[ˈpɪtfɔːl] N (fig) (= danger) → peligro m; (= problem) → dificultad f, escollo m
there are many pitfalls aheadhay muchos peligros por delante
it's a pitfall for the unwaryes una trampa para los imprudentes
how to avoid the pitfalls involved in buying a housecómo evitar las dificultades or los escollos que conlleva la compra de una casa
"Pitfalls of English""Escollos mpl del Inglés"
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

pitfall

[ˈpɪtfɔːl] n (= unsuspected difficulty or danger) → piège m, chausse-trape f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

pitfall

n (fig)Falle f, → Fallstrick m; “Pitfalls of English”„Hauptschwierigkeiten der englischen Sprache
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

pitfall

[ˈpɪtˌfɔːl] n (fig) → tranello, trappola
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

pit1

(pit) noun
1. a large hole in the ground. The campers dug a pit for their rubbish.
2. a place from which minerals are dug, especially a coal-mine. a chalk-pit; He works at/down the pit.
3. a place beside a motor race track for repairing and refuelling racing cars. The leading car has gone into the pit(s).
verbpast tense, past participle ˈpitted
(with against) to set (a person or thing) against another in a fight, competition etc. He was pitted against a much stronger man.
ˈpitfall noun
a possible danger. She has managed to avoid most of the pitfalls of life.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
He was shrewd and calculating, he took note of the pitfalls he must avoid.
I knew the dangers and the pitfalls of John Barleycorn, the various ways by which he had tried to kill me in the past.
Crupp confined herself to making pitfalls on the stairs, principally with pitchers, and endeavouring to delude Peggotty into breaking her legs.
With a kind of religious fervor he had managed to go through the pitfalls of his youth and to remain virginal until after his marriage.
These they shot, or trapped in pitfalls, using the flesh for food, and, after their clothes wore out, the hides for clothing.
What further pitfalls and dangers lay ahead he could not guess; but that he was as far as ever from liberty he was quite willing to believe, so depressing is utter absence of light to one in unfamiliar surroundings.
Body number four, under dreary pretences of being droll (when it was very melancholy indeed), made the shallowest pretences of concealing pitfalls of knowledge, into which it was the duty of these babies to be smuggled and inveigled.
It was a cross-country road, full, after the first three or four miles, of holes and cart-ruts, which, being covered by the snow, were so many pitfalls to the trembling horses, and obliged them to keep a footpace.
But the perilous journey on which she had now adventured herself had another end in view -- an end, dark and distant -- an end, with pitfalls hidden on the way to it, far other than the shallow pitfalls on the way to the stage.
Had they prepared pitfalls? Were the powder mills at Hounslow ready as a snare?
Is it better to reveal the snares and pitfalls of life to the young and thoughtless traveller, or to cover them with branches and flowers?
We are not fit to lead an army on the march unless we are familiar with the face of the country--its mountains and forests, its pitfalls and precipices, its marshes and swamps.